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APPLICATIONS FOR ARRAY PROCESSORS Guest Editor's Introduction

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131614D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Nov-11
Document File: 3 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Douglas J. Theis: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This month's issue is a sequel to Computer's coverage of array processor architecture (September 1981). That issue presented articles on the internal architecture and system capabilities of these machines. The articles in this issue describe end-user applications, showing how,the array processor fits into the system and how it can be used to achieve the necessary high-speed calculations. The main purposes are to show the utility and payoff of the array processor for specific applications and to explore its many significant uses.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

This record contains textual material that is copyright ©; 1983 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved. Contact the IEEE Computer Society http://www.computer.org/ (714-821-8380) for copies of the complete work that was the source of this textual material and for all use beyond that as a record from the SPI Database.

APPLICATIONS FOR ARRAY PROCESSORS Guest Editor's Introduction

Douglas J. Theis,

The Aerospace Corporation

This month's issue is a sequel to Computer's coverage of array processor architecture (September 1981). That issue presented articles on the internal architecture and system capabilities of these machines. The articles in this issue describe end-user applications, showing how,the array processor fits into the system and how it can be used to achieve the necessary high-speed calculations. The main purposes are to show the utility and payoff of the array processor for specific applications and to explore its many significant uses.

Representatives from many major application areas were invited to submit articles; those published in this issue were selected because they best illustrate the wide functional diversity of array processors. The areas

covered include medical imaging, radar signal processing, the modeling of magnetic-mirror fusion devices, recursive nonlinear filtering, real-time flight simulation, astrophysics, and finite element analysis. Some important array processor application areas not covered in this issue, although articles were solicited, include sonar signal processing, oil seismology, speech analysis, and robotics (artificial intelligence).

Some potential application areas, such as weather modeling, turned out to be inappropriate. Weather modeling and prediction require such long production runtimes that virtually all weather applications are run on the vector supercomputers, such as Cray-1 and Control Data Corporation's Cyber 205, or on other large

scale mainframe computers. Many more applications are emerging at the other end of the scale, where hardware and chip technologies have become so inexpensive that low-end performance array processors are now available at the board level. Some companies even advertise an array processor on a chip (Texas Instruments's 320 and Nippon Electric Corporation's PD7720), but these should be considered ALU chips without software and should not be classified as array processors.

In the last five years, array processor manufacturers have considerably improved their software support capabilities, partially overcoming the charge that APs are much too difficult to program. Such support software includes an ANSI Fortran-77 compiler, assembler, loader, object code linker, debugger, and simulator -- all of which run on the host computer attached to the array processor.

In the last five years, array processor manufacturers have considerably improved their software ...