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Method for adhering metallic gold films to a polymeric base material

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131782D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-18
Document File: 3 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for adhering metallic gold (Au) films to a polymeric base material. Benefits include improved functionality and improved reliability.

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Method for adhering metallic gold films to a polymeric base material

Disclosed is a method for adhering metallic gold (Au) films to a polymeric base material. Benefits include improved functionality and improved reliability.

Background

      A polymer film can fail to adhere successfully to a metallic film. As a result, a device with electrically active polymer/metal interfaces can become unusable. An excessive failure rate can cause the device to be not-manufacturable.

              Polymer film adhesion failure is conventionally addressed through the use of nonconductive surface pretreatments. They function as adhesion promoters on the Au film before the conducting polymers are deposited (spun). The resulting interface is fragile, and typically results in delamination of the conducting polymer from the Au film (see Figure 1).

      Another conventional solution is the roughening of the underlying substrate to the polymer, which causes poor reliability and not-uniform device characteristics. Devices built using these nonconductive promoters are subject to noncohesive electrical and physical interfaces, which can result in device failure.

      Molecules that contain sulphur (thiols) are good metal-chelating species. Gold (Au) is typically the target metal of choice due to its value in recovering ionic Au and subsequent reduction to metallic Au as a precious metal. Thiol-polymers are used in applications such as protein research, nanosensors, and drug delivery systems. Each of these systems relies on the orderly coordination of the organothiol material to the surface of a gold particle.

 

General description

              The disclosed method promotes adhesion to form a coherent physical and electrical interface with Au and a polymer.

              The key elements of the disclosed method include:

•             Linear, branched, or dendritic hydrocarbon molecules

•             Subset of polymer end groups with partial polarity and a high affinity to a charged substrate, such as thiols

•             Polymerization of the hydrocarbon

•             Partial charge on end-groups regulated through pH modification

•             Length, degree of branching, and the inclusion of carbenes (or other functional groups) in the hydrocarbon used to modify the optical and resistivity properties of the molecule and polymerized film

Advantages

              The disclosed method provides advantages, including:
•             Improved functionality due to generating a cohesive electrical interface between the Au and the polymer films
•             Improved reliability due to providing a stable and strong interface

Detailed description

      The disclosed method uses an assembled monolayer that is electrically conductive, capable of being polymerized, and can be optimized for a specific metallic film and a specific polymer coating. The conductive characteristic of the film generates a cohesive electrical interface between the Au and polymer films. Polymerization...