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System and Method for Tag Line with URL Pointing To Disclaimer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131811D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-21
Document File: 3 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Corporate policy often requires that all employees include a notice on their email tag line. For example, a typical notice might be: "This message may contain confidential or privileged material. Any use of this information by anyone other than the intended recipient is prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately reply to the sender and delete this information from your system. Use, dissemination, distribution, or reproduction of this message by unintended recipients is not authorized and may be unlawful. Thank you." On one hand, Outlook allows a corporate user to configure a tag line for outgoing email originated on the Desktop. This addresses the problems of completeness (every email gets tagged), and consistency (each email has same tag). On the other hand, desktop manager software for mobile devices allows a mobile user to configure a tag line for outgoing email originated from the device. This enables the device to send messages without the tag line, and the mobile device server adds the tagline, thereby conserving wireless resources for each device originated email message. This addresses the problems of completeness, consistency, and reduces bandwidth for device originated email messages. Nonetheless, every terminated email (both in Outlook and the handheld) may include a notice. Once a notice for a particular correspondant has been received, receiving it over and over again is a waste of bandwidth, unless the notice changes. There is a need to reduce the amount of resources consumed for redundant notice information received in a terminated email generally, and in a device- terminated email in particular. First, instead of typing the body of the notice into Outlook and Desktop Manager, maintain a URL with the content of the notice instead. This increases consistency: both Outlook and device will systematically use the same notice. This is an improvement as before you could forget to update the notice in Outlook or Desktop Manager so that device originated and Outlook originated email might have different notices. Second, re-use notice URL's across organizational units. For example, users having an email address on the company.com domain could use: For a corporate wide notice, a single notice can be maintained at, for example, the following URL: http://www.company.com/email/notice.html For a department wide notice, a single notice can be maintained at, for example, the following URL: http://www.company.com/email/ldept/notice.html For a group wide notice, a single notice can be maintained at, for example, the following URL: http://www.company.com/email/dept/group/notice.html For an individual notice, a single notice can be maintained at, for example, the following URL: http://www.company.com/email/dept/group/somebody/notice.html Third, instead of including the text of the notice in the body of each originating message, embed the URL which points to the notice instead. For example, in an html formatted email message, the following html code would take care of this: Note that there is currently no way in HTML to inline text without using a frame. Thus, if a standardization route would be sought for embeedding this type of notice without a frame, a new tag could be proposed to w3c, such as for example, the following, in analogy to the IMG tag: for general text inline and for email notice inline specifically and for email signatures specifically Fourth, by caching the URL contents on the handheld, the notice need only be downloaded OTA once each time the "version" parameter changes. When this happens, since the complete URL including the "version" parameter would have a different hash, a new cache entry can be used for each new version of a notice URL. Alternatively, before downloading a new version of the notice, the cached version can be copied into each message so as to ensure that the right version of the notice is applied to older messages, and that the new version is applied to the newer messages. Further alternatively, when a message is received at the handheld, any notices are downloaded if they aren't already in cache, and the message is processed to replace notice URLs with the text of the notices. Yet further alternatively, a mechanism other than HTML, such as MIME or CMIME, can be used to inline the notice. This method can be practised on the device alone, on Desktop alone, or preferably on both.

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URL TAG LINE

System and Method for Tag Line with URL Pointing To Disclaimer

Disclosed Anonymously

Corporate policy often requires that all employees include a notice on their email tag line. For example, a typical notice might be:

"This message may contain confidential or privileged material.  Any use of this information by anyone other than the intended recipient is prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately reply to the sender and delete this information from your system. Use, dissemination, distribution, or reproduction of this message by unintended recipients is not authorized and may be unlawful. Thank you."

On one hand, Outlook allows a corporate user to configure a tag line for outgoing email originated on the Desktop. This addresses the problems of completeness (every email gets tagged), and consistency (each email has same tag).

On the other hand, desktop manager software for mobile devices allows a mobile user to configure a tag line for outgoing email originated from the device. This enables the device to send messages without the tag line, and the mobile device server adds the tagline, thereby conserving wireless resources for each device originated email message. This addresses the problems of completeness, consistency, and reduces bandwidth for device originated email messages.

Nonetheless, every terminated email (both in Outlook and the handheld) may include a notice.  Once a notice for a particular correspondant has been received, receiving it over and over again is a waste of bandwidth, unless the notice changes.

There is a need to reduce the amount of resources consumed for redundant notice information received in a terminated email generally, and in a device- terminated email in particular.

First, instead of typing the body of the notice into Outlook and Desktop Manager, maintain a URL with the content of the notice instead. This increases consistency: both Outlook and device will systematically use the same notice. This is an improvement as before you could forget to update the notice in Outlook or Desktop Manager so that device originated and Outlook originated email might have different notices.

Second, re-use notice URL's across organizational units. For example, users having an email address on the company.com domain could use:

For a corporate wide notice, a single notice can be maintained at, for example, the following URL: http://www.company.com/email/notice.html

For a department wide  notice, a single notice can be maintained at,...