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Intelligent HUD (Heads-Up Display) For Mobile Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131816D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

HUDs (Heads-up Displays) are a convenient way to project information into glass, visors, eye wear, or other transparent surfaces. Typically used in the aircraft industry, you can find this technology increasingly used in automobiles, special visors, and eyeglasses. As more and more states ban the user of cell phones, PDAs (personal digital assistants), and other mobile device while operating automobiles, one loses the ability to read email when the car is stopped at a traffic light or stuck in traffic. Automobiles or eyeglasses can be equipped with HUD technology and, when connected to the automobile, the device could interface with the car and determine when it is appropriate to display information. Also applications could be designed to push data to the device for displaying via HUD technology.      I see these main applications of this technology: 1. When stuck in traffic, or stopped for an extended period of time, the device would allow the user to view emails/messages through the HUD. Once the car is in motion, the device would be notified and the display would be turned off as to not distract the driver. The basic indicators could always be shown, such as incoming voice calls with caller ID (user would use a Bluetooth headset) and general count indicators on applications that are mobile devices (Calendar Reminder, unread email counts). 2. Applications could be designed to use the HUD to provide the user with specific information while driving. Examples would be a GPS equipped device that could determine the car’s location and route and monitor any weather or traffic problems that the driver might encounter on this route. Alternatively, alternate directions could be displayed. Example: If the user was driving down the highway, the device could periodically upload the car's location and direction to a server. The server would monitor the car and weather and traffic ahead. If the server sees a potential problem, it would notify the device, and suggest an alternate route. For example: Accident ahead road closed 8 miles ahead, take exit 55 to avoid. The device in turn would notify the user via the HUD display and the driver could avoid the hazard. The server would continue to monitor the route until the driver reached his/her destination. 3. Another example application is a GPS device that could monitor for services that the car might be passing by. For example: The user wants to be notified if the car comes close to a restaurant serving a certain cuisine. While the user is driving, the server monitors the car's location and direction and searches for restaurants meeting the user’s requirements. As the car approaches, the server notifies the device and in turn the user via the HUD: Restaurant X (Rating = ****) is 3 miles away, take night right.

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INTELLIGENT HUD

Intelligent HUD (Heads-Up Display) For

Mobile

Devices

Disclosed Anonymously

HUDs (Heads-up Displays) are a convenient way to project information into glass, visors, eye wear, or other transparent surfaces.  Typically used in the aircraft industry, you can find this technology increasingly used in automobiles, special visors, and eyeglasses.

As more and more states ban the user of cell phones, PDAs (personal digital assistants), and other mobile device while operating automobiles, one loses the ability to read email when the car is stopped at a traffic light or stuck in traffic.

Automobiles or eyeglasses can be equipped with HUD technology and, when connected to the automobile, the device could interface with the car and determine when it is appropriate to display information.

Also applications could be designed to push data to the device for displaying via HUD technology.     

I see these main applications of this technology:

1. When stuck in traffic, or stopped for an extended period of time, the device would allow the user to view emails/messages through the HUD. Once the car is in motion, the device would be notified and the display would be turned off as to not distract the driver.  The basic indicators could always be shown, such as incoming voice calls with caller ID (user would use a Bluetooth headset) and general count indicators on applications that are mobile devices (Calendar Reminder, unread email counts).

2. Applications could be designed to use the HUD to provide the...