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Browse Prior Art Database

Over-the-Air (OTA) Application Backup Sytem for a Mobile Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131829D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Mobile wireless devices have very limited memory capacity. For example, on certain mobile devices, when the device becomes full, it is not possible to create new records on the device. Although the low memory manager will be activated, it is restricted to deleting old data. Only user data is removed and not application code. A significant amount of memory is dedicated to the application code, much of which is not executed by the user. That application code uses memory that could be used to hold additional user data. The user may be unaware that a large unused application is using a significant amount of memory. The user may have the option of deleting an application module from the device but the module is lost forever. Should the user require the application in the future, the user would have to reinstall the application but he may not remember where he installed the application from or it may be inconvenient to access the installation file remotely. This invention is an automatic backup system for applications installed on the device, which will provide the user with an additional means to free-up memory for important user data. An agent on the device monitors applications on the device that haven't been used for a certain amount of time. Under low memory conditions, the user is provided with an interface or notified that certain unused applications haven't been executed. The interface provides details on how much memory can be reclaimed if the application is removed from the handheld. For example, the user can choose the following: 1) Not to remove the application. 2) Back it up on the server by transferring the application code over-the-air to the server and remove the application code from the device. Note: An application could be backed up upon installation, in which case, the application will not be backed up again here on this step. 3) Remove the application code from the device without backing it up. If the user chooses to remove and backup the application code, the application's associated data (if not shared by other applications) is also backed up and removed. An application reference is maintained on the handheld so that the user knows that the application was previously installed but is no longer resident on the handheld. If the user is not sure what to do and decides not to remove the application, the device provides an interface that allows them to remove or backup the application manually. To ensure that multiple copies of the same applications are not duplicated on the server with multiple users, the server could keep at most one copy per version of an application for all users as an optimization (a binary comparison could be applied here). Of course, the server maintains a table of which users own which applications. When the user discovers that they need a particular application (and they have adequate memory to restore the application), they can access the old reference and request the application to be restored. The application code is sent over-the-air to the handheld, the application is re-initialized, and when the transaction is complete, the server removes its copy of the code (if there are no other users backing up that module). All transactions are encrypted to prevent security attacks.

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OTA APPLICATION BACKUP

Over-the-Air (OTA) Application Backup Sytem for a

Mobile

Device

Disclosed Anonymously

Mobile wireless devices have very limited memory capacity. For example, on certain mobile devices, when the device becomes full, it is not possible to create new records on the device. Although the low memory manager will be activated, it is restricted to deleting old data.  Only user data is removed and not application code. 

A significant amount of memory is dedicated to the application code, much of which is not executed by the user.  That application code uses memory that could be used to hold additional user data. The user may be unaware that a large unused application is using a significant amount of memory.  

The user may have the option of deleting an application module from the device but the module is lost forever.  Should the user require the application in the future, the user would have to reinstall the application but he may not remember where he installed the application from or it may be inconvenient to access the installation file remotely.

This invention is an automatic backup system for applications installed on the device, which will provide the user with an additional means to free-up memory for important user data.

An agent on the device monitors applications on the device that haven't been used for a certain amount of time.  Under low memory conditions, the user is provided with an interface or notified that certain unused applications haven't been executed.  The interface provides details on how much memory can be reclaimed if the application is removed from the handheld. 

For example, the user can choose the following:

1) Not to remove the application.

2) Back it up on the server by transferring the application code over-the-air ...