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The Integration of Location-Based Information from a GPS Receiver with Presence Information in a Quick-Messaging Application

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131847D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Quick-messaging or instant messaging applications provide presence information so that it is possible to view the status of other parties on the contact list. Although voice calls and messaging can be effective way of communicating with other parties, many people will prefer face-to-face meetings if the other contact is nearby. Or, they may wish to coordinate physically meeting-up with a contact through the quick-messaging application. Either way, it would be helpful to know the current location of the other party. Currently, it is only possible to arrange face-to-face meetings by sending descriptive instructions to the other party, which is time-consuming and prone to misunderstanding. The proposed invention consists of the integration of location-based data with presence information in a quick-messaging application. The location of a user is provided by a GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver embedded in the wireless device. The user's current latitude, longitude, and altitude information is transmitted with their current status to parties on the contact list. GPS positioning data is accurate to within 2 to 3 metres with 95% confidence. When a party receives this information, it calculates its own location, and the distance to the other contact. A quick-messaging application typically contains a list of icons that represent contacts. Beside each contact, the physical distance in metres or kilometres can be displayed. Alternatively, the icon can appear dimmed if the contact is far away, and increase in intensity when it draws near. Based on historical positioning information or a built-in compass, it is possible to establish a party's direction of movement. Thus, for contacts located within a reasonable distance such as 500 metres, the compass direction to a contact can also be indicated beside the icon through a rotating arrow or similar graphical element. This makes it possible to find someone in a shopping mall, crowded restaurant, etc. If a party's current speed is also transmitted, it is possible to calculate the amount of time required to arrive at a contact's current location through extrapolation, if the contact is within the current heading arc. Thus, it is possible to arrange to meet someone in 15 minutes if that time is displayed beside the icon based on a current walking or driving pace. If the application is implemented on a mobile device, to conserve battery power or maintain privacy, it is possible to disable the transmission of location-based data to other contacts. Furthermore, such information may only be transmitted to another party if it is within close range, such as one kilometre, with increasing frequency of transmission as the contact comes closer and closer. The system described is for location data to be pushed, whereas it can also be pulled on demand through the request of a location update by any party. Existing positioning systems rely on a model where a set of mobile devices, or agents, transmit their current location to a central server, where an operator is then responsible for coordinating all agents. This invention, however, describes point-to-point location updates to all contacts on the list.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

LOCATION-BASED QUICK MESSAGES

The Integration of Location-Based Information from a GPS Receiver with Presence Information in a Quick-Messaging Application

Disclosed Anonymously

Quick-messaging or instant messaging applications provide presence information so that it is possible to view the status of other parties on the contact list. Although voice calls and messaging can be effective way of communicating with other parties, many people will prefer face-to-face meetings if the other contact is nearby. Or, they may wish to coordinate physically meeting-up with a contact through the quick-messaging application. Either way, it would be helpful to know the current location of the other party.

Currently, it is only possible to arrange face-to-face meetings by sending descriptive instructions to the other party, which is time-consuming and prone to misunderstanding.

The proposed invention consists of the integration of location-based data with presence information in a quick-messaging application. The location of a user is provided by a GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver embedded in the wireless device.

The user's current latitude, longitude, and altitude information is transmitted with their current status to parties on the contact list. GPS positioning data is accurate to within 2 to 3 metres with 95% confidence. When a party receives this information, it calculates its own location, and the distance to the other contact.

A quick-messaging application typically contains a list of icons that represent contacts. Beside each contact, the physical distance in metres or kilometres can be displayed. Alternatively, the icon can appear dimmed if the contact is far away, and increase in intensity when it draws near.

Based on historica...