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System for Enabling Any Wirelessly Enabled Mobile Device to Act As a Physical Security Key

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131852D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The ability to open a door without a physical key is not new. Garage door openers and security passes have been using RF technology to signal a door to open for years. These systems are flawed, however, in that it is possible to attack the system and obtain entry into a building. Garage doors, and office entry points all are areas where keyless doors are in operation. In the future we will see this technology move to residential and public sector institutions like (e.g., hotels, resorts, etc.) The proposed solution leverages a high standard of encyrption on mobile devices and applies this to physical security. In theory, it is possible to have the locking system on all doors connected via a network to a central based computer server. This server would contain connections to all locks. Each lock would have an ID and a sensor. These sensors could use a WiFi technology like 802.11 or Bluetooth. When a device/phone is in close proximity to a lock, it would establish communications with the lock sensor. This sensor acts like a gateway to the central server so that the device can talk directly to the controlling server. The device would talk on a newly devised protocol over some wireless transport like Bluetooth, WiFi (802.11) or some other RF mechanism. In order for the device to sucessfully communicate to the server, all communication is encrypted. The server will only talk to the device if it can successfully decrypt the packets the device is sending. The key algorithm used will be the same algorithm that protects a mobile device’s corporate email. The user will set up the security system by generating a key when cradling the device in the building’s network. At this point the server and device have a common key. With a common key the device and server can now communicate and the system is secure. In case the user loses their phone/device, a pass-phrase system is implemented. Different pass phrases or one general pass phrase is used for each entry point. When the user approaches the door and establishes communication with the server through the keylock acting as a sensor, the device will have some UI indication that a connection has been established, and a dialog will be presented to enter the pass phrase. Once the user enters the pass phrase, the packet is encrypted with the key stored on the device and sent to the server. If the server can decrypt the packet and the pass phrase is correct the server will send the unlock command. Once a lock sensor is no longer in communication with the device, it ensures the entry point is locked (i.e., as you walk away from the door, it auto-locks the door). Also the idea of a pass phrase provides added security features that are not available for such systems as garage door openers or proximity security badges. This technology can also be extended to devices that don't have the ability to detect and talk to the door sensors. An application can be devised that talks to the central server over an existing mobile data network infrastructure so that commands can be sent to open entry points with the pass phrase over known data channels.

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SECURE WIRELESS PHYSICAL KEY SYSTEM

System for Enabling Any Wirelessly Enabled

Mobile

Device to Act As a Physical Security Key

Disclosed Anonymously

The ability to open a door without a physical key is not new.  Garage door openers and security passes have been using RF technology to signal a door to open for years. These systems are flawed, however, in that it is possible to attack the system and obtain entry into a building.

Garage doors, and office entry points all are areas where keyless doors are in operation.  In the future we will see this technology move to residential and public sector institutions like (e.g., hotels, resorts, etc.)

The proposed solution leverages a high standard of encyrption on mobile devices and applies this to physical security. In theory, it is possible to have the locking system on all doors connected via a network to a central based computer server. This server would contain connections to all locks.  Each lock would have an ID and a sensor.  These sensors could use a WiFi technology like 802.11 or Bluetooth.

When a device/phone is in close proximity to a lock, it would establish communications with the lock sensor.  This sensor acts like a gateway to the central server so that the device can talk directly to the controlling server. The device would talk on a newly devised protocol over some wireless transport like Bluetooth, WiFi (802.11) or some other RF mechanism.

In order for the device to sucessfully communicate to the server, all communication is encrypted. The server will only talk to the device if it can successfully decrypt the packets the device is sending.

The key algorithm used will be the same algorithm that protects a mobile device’s corpora...