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A Method of User Presence Detection Using a Light Sensor on a Mobile Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131856D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

In order to achieve a long battery life, mobile devices typically shut off the display (e.g., LCD) when the user is not actively using the device. Currently, the user must press a key or roll the wheel to "wake-up" a device with the LCD off (timed-out). It would be beneficial to predict when a user intends to wake-up the device, without actually having to press any keys. In a product which incorporates a light sensor, the sensor could be used to detect sudden changes in brightness and trigger the LCD wake-up sequence. For example, when the device is sitting out on a desk, the user would only have to pick it up and the screen would turn on (light sensor readings would vary, based on hand motions in front the device, or change of angle from the ambient light). The device would "feel" much more intuitive. This may also address further issues with mobile devices. For example, when a user is on a phone call, a screen may timeout. If the call requires the user to "press 1 to continue", the user would take the phone away from their ear, press 1, and expect to continue, however the first keypress would be used by the system to turn on the LCD, and the user would have to press "1" a second time to make a valid input. With a light sensor proximity detect implementation, the LCD would automatically come on when the phone was removed from the user's ear. Light sensor detection could also be used to determine whether to time-out the LCD during a web-browsing session. The light sensor could be used to determine whether the device is being actively used (i.e., carried around), or put down / away.

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PRESENCE DETECTION USING LIGHT SENSOR

A Method of User Presence Detection Using a Light Sensor on a

Mobile

Device

Disclosed Anonymously

In order to achieve a long battery life, mobile devices typically shut off the display (e.g., LCD) when the user is not actively using the device. Currently, the user must press a key or roll the wheel to "wake-up" a device with the LCD off (timed-out). It would be beneficial to predict when a user intends to wake-up the device, without actually having to press any keys.

In a product which incorporates a light sensor, the sensor could be used to detect sudden changes in brightness and trigger the LCD wake-up sequence. For example, when the device is sitting out on a desk, the user would only have to pick it up and the screen would turn on (light sensor readings would vary, based on hand motions in front the device, or change of angle from the ambient light).

The device would "feel" much more intuitive. This may also address further issues with mobile devices. For example, when a user is on a phone call, a screen may timeout. If the call requires the user to "press 1 to continue", the user would take the phone away from their ear, press 1, and expect to continue, however the first keypress would be used by the system to turn on the LCD, and the user would have to press "1" a second time to make a valid input. With a light sensor proximity detect implementation, the LCD would automatically come on when the phone was removed from the user's ear...