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Techniques to Provide Partial Ear Sealing to Improve the Sound Quality of a Mobile Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131885D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Mobile devices are compact in size and do not allow manufacturers the luxury of having a large ear sealing area around the telephone receiver. Sound quality of these units are negatively affected by sound leakage in the area between the receiver and the person’s ear. Users compensate by trying to move the handheld till the sound quality is perceived to be as good as they can get it. Sometimes this may include pushing the unit more firmly against the ear. The ear seal can aid in stopping the leakage of sound over the protected area by physically sealing the air space between the unit and the ear. Three techniques can be implemented: 1. A compressible elastic ear seal may be attached on the front portion of the unit. 2. A gel-filled sack type seal may be used that will conform to the shape of the space between the ear and the unit. 3. A movable seal may be used that is not extended from the unit until the device is held firmly against the ear. This is accomplished simply by the user holding the phone to the ear and is not a conscious effort. Mobile devices cannot afford the space to provide the luxury of having a seal that goes all around the ear, thus a partial, flexible seal has been proposed that does not consume much real estate of the face of the device.

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PARTIAL RECEIVER EAR SEAL

Techniques to Provide Partial Ear Sealing to Improve the Sound Quality of a

Mobile

Device

Disclosed Anonymously

Mobile devices are compact in size and do not allow manufacturers the luxury of having a large ear sealing area around the telephone receiver. Sound quality of these units are negatively affected by sound leakage in the area between the receiver and the person’s ear. Users compensate by trying to move the handheld till the sound quality is perceived to be as good as they can get it. Sometimes this may include pushing the unit more firmly against the ear.

The ear seal can aid in stopping the leakage of sound over the protected area by physically sealing the air space between the unit and the ear. Three techniques can be implemented:

1. A compressible elastic ear seal may be attached on the front portion of the unit.

2. A gel-filled sack type seal may be used that will conform to the shape of the space between the ear and the unit.

3. A movable seal may be used that is not extended from the unit until the device is held firmly against the ear. This is accomplished simply by the user holding the phone to the ear and is not a conscious effort.

Mobile devices cannot afford the space to provide the luxury of having a seal that goes all around the ear, thus a partial, flexible seal has been proposed that does not consume much real estate of the face of the device.