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System and Method of Peer-to-Peer Device Data Relay

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131903D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This invention addresses the issues that arise from the different costs of wireless plans and network coverage dead spots. The ideal use of this invention is for devices that are can use either WiFi (e.g. 802.11) and wide area wireless networks (e.g., Mobitex, GPRS, etc.). This invention could also be used for devices with wireless (e.g., Mobitex, GPRS, etc.) ability and an infrared port. The main idea behind this invention is to permit devices to act as proxies for other devices in the field. Consider the following scenarios: 1. A user has a GPRS device and another friend has a Mobitex device. Both users are visiting a remote area where the GPRS device has coverage but the Mobitex device does not have coverage. 2. A user visiting a company: Once he/she enters the building, his/her device does not have coverage but the company that is being visited has WiFi support which allows access to the corporate email of the visiting company. 3. A couple (or two friends), where one of the spouses has an unlimited data transfer package and the other spouse has a higher cost plan. 4. A team of scientists in a remote area with no coverage but with one of the scientists going to town (where there is coverage) on a weekly basis for supplies. In all the scenarios mentioned above, we would like to have the device that has cheap or convenient coverage inform a relay that it is acting as a proxy to other devices. Later the proxy device would relay the information to the device that owns the data. The device that owns the data could as well use the proxy device to communicate information back. This could be done in a live mode using WiFi, or more in a batch mode using infrared if the proxy device is too far away, as in the case of the scientists. Transfer over a wired connection, such as USB, is also possible. This invention allows devices to use other devices as proxies for them. When a proxy device is within a set wireless range, it notifies other devices about their messages. Or in the case of infrared-enabled device, the owner of the proxy device must initiate a manual transfer. The invention insures that data between a device and the service are still encrypted so the proxy device cannot access the data. Furthermore, the device which wants the device to act as a proxy for it must initiate the proxying request to the service. A sample use case would be as follows: - Device A is in coverage, Device B is out of coverage but wants to receive its email from service C - The owners of Device A and Device B will have to permit both devices to talk to each other by inputting the ID of the other device in a communication setting. - Device B would initiate the proxy request by asking Device A to send a proxy request to Service C. The contents of the proxy request would have to be encrypted using the key shared between Service C and Device B. Also the proxy request could be either time- or message-limited to prevent Device A from acting as a proxy server forever to Device B. - Device A sends the encrypted proxy request to a network redirection server, which in turn sends it to the service C. Service C verifies the proxy request. Then it directs Device B’s data to relay and informs relay that if Device B is out of coverage it should send the data to Device A. - Since the data is encrypted, Device A getting the data cannot read it; the device just has to forward it. - Device A can then forward the data to Device B through its WiFi antenna, or it can store the data till Device B is close by; then it can forward the data either through infrared or WiFi.

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Peer-To-Peer Device Data Relay

System and Method of Peer-to-Peer Device Data Relay

Disclosed Anonymously

This invention addresses the issues that arise from the different costs of wireless plans and network coverage dead spots. The ideal use of this invention is for devices that are can use either WiFi (e.g. 802.11) and wide area wireless networks (e.g., Mobitex, GPRS, etc.). This invention could also be used for devices with wireless (e.g., Mobitex, GPRS, etc.) ability and an infrared port. The main idea behind this invention is to permit devices to act as proxies for other devices in the field.

Consider the following scenarios:

    1. A user has a GPRS device and another friend has a Mobitex device. Both users are visiting a remote area where the GPRS device has coverage but the Mobitex device does not have coverage.

    2. A user visiting a company: Once he/she enters the building, his/her device does not have coverage but the company that is being visited has WiFi support which allows access to the corporate email of the visiting company.

   3. A couple (or two friends), where one of the spouses has an unlimited data transfer package and the other spouse has a higher cost plan.

   4. A team of scientists in a remote area with no coverage but with one of the scientists going to town (where there is coverage) on a weekly basis for supplies.

In all the scenarios mentioned above, we would like to have the device that has cheap or convenient coverage inform a relay that it is acting as a proxy to other devices. Later the proxy device would relay the information to the device that owns the data. The device that owns the data could as well use the proxy device to communicate information back. This could be done in a live mode using WiFi, or more in a batch mode using infrared if the proxy device is too far away, as in the case of the scientists.  Transfer over a wired connection, such as USB, is also possible.

This invention...