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Multi-Server System with Different Step Queues On Each Server Sharing Delivery/Success Failure Information

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131916D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Existing solutions exist for the problem of email messages that cannot be delivered but continue to stack up in the outbound queue causing undue processing and bandwidth consumption. To address this problem, a queue with multiple steps is used and messages are sucessively moved to lower queues where re-send attempts become less frequent, so as not to congest the primary queue. Furthermore, as one queue is able to deliver a message to an address to which delivery attempt(s) previously failed, this information is propagated through the queue levels so messages directed to the same address could be returned to the primary queue. However, this only applies to queues residing on the same server. Thus, when multiple step queues are implemented on different servers, messages can languish in a lower-tier queue on one server, while other servers were able to sucesfully deliver messages to a same address/ISP associated with the languishing messages. The multiple step queues "talk" to each other across the different servers using a UDP (user datagram protocol) or multicast channel broadcast to communicate delivery failures/sucesses so that the other step queues can automatically move messages with common addresses/carriers to a lower/higher queue. Thus, message delivery is optimized not only within the single step queue, but also across all of the step queues in the network.

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Step Queue Enhancement

Multi-Server System with Different Step Queues On Each Server Sharing Delivery/Success Failure Information

Disclosed Anonymously

Existing solutions exist for the problem of email messages that cannot be delivered but continue to stack up in the outbound queue causing undue processing and bandwidth consumption. To address this problem, a queue with multiple steps is used and messages are sucessively moved to lower queues where re-send attempts become less frequent, so as not to congest the primary queue.

Furthermore, as one queue is able to deliver a message to an address to which delivery attempt(s) previously failed, this information is propagated through the queue levels so messages directed to the same address could be returned to the primary queue. However, this only applies to queues residing on the same server. Thus, when multiple step queues are implemented on different servers, messages can languish in a lower-tier queue on one server, while other servers were able to sucesfully deliver messages to a same address/ISP associated with the languishing messages.

The multiple step queues "talk" to each other across the different servers using a UDP (user datagram protocol) or multicast channel broadcast to communicate delivery failures/sucesses so that the other step queues can automatically move messages with common addresses/carriers to a lower/higher queue. Thus, message delivery is optimized not only within the single step queue, but also across...