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Desktop-Enabling Docking Station for Use with a Portable Electronic Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131917D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Currently, there is a clear distinction between desktop PCs and portable communications devices, for example, PDAs with wireless communications abilities. Desktop PCs are integral to the daily functioning of virtually all modern corporations. Companies are also relying more and more heavily on portable email devices for effective communications. Individuals and corporations spend large amounts of money purchasing both portable communications devices and desktop PCs. The first problem that this invention disclosure addresses is the non-portable and expensive nature of desktop PCs (they don't fit well in your pocket). This invention also addresses the problem of external hardware connectivity limitations of portable electronics communications devices, specifically to external monitors. A major factor preventing the use of some PDAs as desktop PCs is their inablility to connect to standard external devices, such as keyboards, mice, and video monitors. This invention blurs the distinction between desktop PCs and portable communications devices, by allowing a portable communications device to also act as a desktop PC. This also makes desktop PCs more affordable, as you need only purchase a portable communications device and special docking station. This docking station will allow communications between standard external hardware devices and the portable communications device. The user simply docs their PDAs to this station (connecting via a USB cable) and they may now use their standard keyboard, monitor, etc, just as if they were using a normal desktop PC. The main advantage is that user doesn't need to purchase a standard desktop PC - their PDA now performs this functionality. A 'translator' may need to be placed at the OS level which encodes/decodes communications to and from external devices. This 'translator' will act as a hub for all peripheral communications to and from the PDA via the USB cable. Docking Station Specifications:Input/Output Ports - standard AC wall supply (120v) - USB connectivity (to handheld) - optional USB ports for other external devices (hard drives, CD ROM, etc) - keyboard port - mouse port - standard 15-pin video port (connects to monitor) - headset port (could be used to place phone calls while PDA is docked). The PDA connects to the corporate LAN via the internal wireless modem, using 802.11g Wireless LAN standard. All networks drives, printers, etc are available for the user, as they would be for a regular desktop PC on the LAN. The docking station includes a translator that encodes all input data and sends it to the PDA (via USB cable) where it is decoded. Likewise, the PDA sends any outgoing information (except for LAN data which is communicated via the wireless modem) to the docking station, where it is decoded ('translated') and sent to the appropriate output device (e.g. video monitor). In addition to connecting to a desktop PC monitor, the VGA output would allow you to connect to any display device with a standard 15-pin plug. For example, imagine being able to connect your PDA to a video projector to display your presentation slides during a seminar.

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docking station for A portable electronic device

Desktop-Enabling Docking Station for Use with a Portable Electronic Device

Disclosed Anonymously

Currently, there is a clear distinction between desktop PCs and portable communications devices, for example, PDAs with wireless communications abilities. Desktop PCs are integral to the daily functioning of virtually all modern corporations. Companies are also relying more and more heavily on portable email devices for effective communications. Individuals and corporations spend large amounts of money purchasing both portable communications devices and desktop PCs. The first problem that this invention disclosure addresses is the non-portable and expensive nature of desktop PCs (they don't fit well in your pocket). This invention also addresses the problem of external hardware connectivity limitations of portable electronics communications devices, specifically to external monitors.

A major factor preventing the use of some PDAs as desktop PCs is their inablility to connect to standard external devices, such as keyboards, mice, and video monitors.

This invention blurs the distinction between desktop PCs and portable communications devices, by allowing a portable communications device to also act as a desktop PC. This also makes desktop PCs more affordable, as you need only purchase a portable communications device and special docking station. This docking station will allow communications between standard external hardware devices and the portable communications device. The user simply docs their PDAs to this station (connecting via a USB cable) and they may now use their standard keyboard, monitor, etc, just as if they were using a normal desktop P...