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Method for Maximizing Log Content Value While Minimizing Log Size through Dynamic Log-Level Boosting

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000131920D
Publication Date: 2005-Nov-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 10K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The idea of logging activity in a system is crucial to the identification and diagnosis of problems (bugs).

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Dynamic Log-Level Boost

Method for Maximizing Log Content Value While Minimizing Log Size through Dynamic Log-Level Boosting

Disclosed Anonymously

The idea of logging activity in a system is crucial to the identification and diagnosis of problems (bugs).

In most large systems (e.g., device software, e-mail servers servers, the network redirection servers), log items have an associated level (e.g., Critical, Serious, Moderate, Low and Informational, or simply 1, 2, 3, 4, etc.).

In the ideal case, the logs would contain all the possible log items. However, that would consume an unacceptable amount of storage space. Consider that it doesn't take much to overflow the capacity of a portable device, and that even though server systems have lots of storage space, log events accumulate much more rapidly than on a portable device.

The most frequently encountered solution to the storage problem is to limit the "log level" to only record the most important events.

This reduction usually doesn't compromise the ability to identify that a problem occurred. However, without the less important events, diagnosis of the problem (bug) is much more difficult, and often impossible.

The main idea is to "boost" the effective log level whenever a higher event happens.

To do this, the logging system has to record all the lower events in a circular queue without writing them out to the log itself.

Consider that in some environments, log events are not necessarily the same size, so the circular queue can be limited based on size (in bytes) or on the number of log events. It can also be limited by elapsed time or other system specific factors. For advanced applications, it can even b...