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Drag Cursor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000132144D
Publication Date: 2005-Dec-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Shawn Day: INVENTOR

Related Documents

U.S. 5,907,327: PATENT [+2]

Abstract

A cursor or highlighter on a display can adopt a particular appearance whenever a drag operation has been activated or is active (e.g. adopt the appearance of a “drag cursor”). When the user taps or otherwise ends the drag operation, the cursor can revert to an appearance that does not indicate drag, such as the standard Windows “arrow” appearance.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 43% of the total text.

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Drag Cursor Shawn Day

Drag Cursor

1. Inventor(s): Shawn Day

2. Synaptics Incorporated, Santa Clara, CA, USA

3. Short Summary

A cursor or highlighter on a display can adopt a particular appearance whenever a drag operation has been activated or is active (e.g. adopt the appearance of a "drag cursor"). When the user taps or otherwise ends the drag operation, the cursor can revert to an appearance that does not indicate drag, such as the standard Windows "arrow" appearance.

4. General Description

Despite the success and popularity of EdgeMotionTM1 functionality for extending drag operations past the physical boundaries of touch pads, it can be quite difficult to control the speed and direction of cursor motion while edge motion is active. This difficulty often leads to overshoot past the intended target/target area, requiring some backtracking in the opposite direction to converge on icons, small display targets, or the like. Furthermore, edge motion breaks the normal paradigm of using multiple finger strokes (or "rowing") for moving the cursor long distances, since a drag operation is usually terminated as soon as the finger leaves the surface of the touch pad if edge motion was active.

An alternate solution known as "Drag Lock" is much more intuitive and efficient for many users. With Drag Lock, once a drag operation has been initiated, a drag mode results where the drag operation is maintained across multiple finger strokes until terminated either by a specific user action or a timeout. The timeout is sometimes undesirable because there is no timeout interval that is appropriate for all situations and users. For example, if the timeout is too short, then the drag mode will inadvertently terminate between finger strokes while the user is "rowing" and repeatedly lifting and stroking the touch pad to move the dragged object. On the other hand, if the timeout is made longer, then the user will be forced to wait for the drag mode to end before initiating normal cursor motion and selection. As a result, the user-initiated "tap" action is better suited than a timeout for terminating drag mode for many users.

However, there is a drawback with Drag Lock. If the user initiates a drag operation with the Drag Lock feature enabled, and then forgets to terminate it, the user-interface will be "stuck" in drag mode with possibly no visible indication of that fact. Normal cursor motion and selection operations will not work properly with drag mode active in common operating systems such as the Windows interface, because it will appear to the operating system as if the left mouse button is being held down continuously (drag operations being indicated to Windows via a continued actuation of the left mouse button). This

1 EdgeMotionTM: When a user's finger reaches the edge of the sensor, EdgeMotion function can be activated to continue the cursor motion until the finger is lifted. ( http://www.synaptics.com/products/touchpad.cfm )

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