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Automatic Prefix Detection with Cell Phones

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000132288D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Dec-06
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Dec-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

With today's cell-phone technology, a person can not specify a single phone number in an address book for a person, because the number that they need to dial varies depending on their calling location. Known solutions today involve a person creating multiple copies of a person's phone number, depending on their calling location or modifying the phone number manually by adding (or deleting) the right prefix. The drawbacks are extra time to enter the number and the possibility that the person may not even know how to place the call (for example, if they are in a foreign country and do not know the country code of where they are calling - perhaps because it is their country code and they have never had to specify it in the past). A combination of GPS technology, wireless internet technology and a simple software database enables the phone to determine the correct digits to dial, instead of forcing the user to maintain multiple copies of this information.

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Automatic Prefix Detection with Cell Phones

With today's cellular phone technology, people who travel with their phones find it difficult to store a single phone number in their address books for each contact person because the number that they need to dial depends on their calling location. Known solutions today involve creating multiple copies of a person's phone number, a different one for each calling location, or modifying the stored phone number manually when placing a call, by adding or deleting the correct prefix. The drawbacks to the current situation are:

* The caller must spend extra time and effort to enter the phone number and prefixes.
* The caller might not even know how to place the call. (For example, people who rarely travel outside the country might not know their own country code, especially if they have never had to specify it in the past).

We propose to use GPS technology, wireless Internet technology, and a simple software database to enable the cellular phone to determine the correct digits to dial, instead of requiring the user to maintain multiple copies of this information.

This can be implemented by combining several well-known areas of technology:

Phone Number Entry:

Users enter phone numbers into the address book of their cellular phones using the full number, including country code and area code. The phone would provide intelligent defaults, namely the country and area code for the majority of stored phone numbers, or the codes that apply to the country or geographical region where the phone was purchased.

Country Code Information:

The cellular phone would be preconfigured with default country and area code information for countries and areas (e.g. around the world). This information sometimes changes, so people could download updates to a database from the Internet on demand as required. (For most people, this would be fairly infrequent, such as when a new area code is introduced that aff...