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Improving the Defect Performance of PECVD Processes Related to Shower Head or Chamber Degradation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000132315D
Publication Date: 2005-Dec-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for improving the defect performance for a generic PECVD tool. Benefits include fewer OOC events for defects and longer PM cycles.

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Improving the Defect Performance of PECVD Processes Related to Shower Head or Chamber Degradation

Disclosed is a method for improving the defect performance for a generic PECVD tool. Benefits include fewer OOC events for defects and longer PM cycles.

Background

In every PECVD that uses an F-based cleaning process and aluminum chamber components, AlF3 is formed as a result of the cleaning process. During pretreatment, deposition, or post treatment, the AlF3 is dislodged due to the CTE differences between the AlF3 on the surface and the aluminum shower head. These defects reduce the yield by causing patterning defects in subsequent steps.

To address this problem, the tool is taken down to either remove the AlF3 layer, or form a more uniform AlF3 layer. Unfortunately, both approaches result in lower tool availability and/or output.

General Description

The disclosed method adds a layer of SiN or other structurally strong film (e.g. a higher potassium/lower pressure SiC film), in addition to the SiO undercoat layer. By adding an additional layer to "glue" AlF3 particles to the shower heads, the particles are not dislodged during wafer processing. The following are the process steps for the disclosed method:

 

  1. Deposit the 1-5 um oxide
  2. Deposit the 0.1 - 3 um SiN (or another mechanically stable) film
  3. Deposit 0.5-3 um of film to be run on the wafer
  4. Deposit film on the wafers 
  5. When the film is thick enough to flake off of the chamber walls or cause a shift in the process, all films are...