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Summary Events

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000132352D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Dec-09
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Dec-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

In an event driven system, a user interface requests information which may receive one or more responses, the user interface not knowing how many will be received. This problem may be solved by the sending of a "summary" event once all the responses have been sent, so that the user interface knows that no more responses will be received. Until the "summary" event is received, the user interface knows that more responses may be received.

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Summary Events

When using an event driven system, a user interface sends requests for information, and at some point in the future can receive one or more responses to its request. These requests can require a large quantity of processing and will take an indeterminate amount of time to complete, which is made worse by the fact that there may be a long pause before the first response is sent back. During this time the user interface cannot know whether to offer the user feedback in the form of an hour glass, or "please wait" dialog because it does not know if there will be zero responses, or several that are just taking a long time.

      The use of summary events which are guaranteed to be returned as the result of a request, these events can be used to ensure appropriate user feedback, and to confirm that the underlying event driven system is working correctly. This event driven interface with the summary events included allows the advantages of an event driven asynchronous interface but with the ability to guarantee responses and provide good user feedback as to the progress.

      The user interface or program registers an interest in particular objects (e.g. objects on a remote system) with the event interface, the first time this happens there will be a delay between the registrations, and the first set of data being received as an event. During this delay the user interface will display a progress bar to let the user know that data is being searched for. If any information is found, the data is sent o...