Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Method for avoiding interrupting applications during presentations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000132353D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Dec-09
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Dec-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a program for a simpler and more flexible system of minimising the interruption of computer-based presentations by unexpected programs or events. Primary components are active detection of presentation display, through the use of video signal standards, and a configurable virtual desktop to control what applications are allowed in the foreground.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 80% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Method for avoiding interrupting applications during presentations

Disclosed is a program for a simpler and more flexible system of minimising the interruption of computer-based presentations by unexpected programs or events. Primary components are active detection of presentation display, through the use of video signal standards, and a configurable virtual desktop to control what applications are allowed in the foreground.

    Not all presentations use (especially not exclusively) specific presentation software, particularly in the technical arena, and even those which do seem prone to amusing, annoying or embarrassing "pop ups". The continuing prevalence of these events demonstrates that presenters do not take the necessary steps to avoid this (exiting " known problem" applications etc).

    A superior method of avoiding interruption contains two elements. Firstly, detection of projectors is possible through video standards such as VESA DDC (Display Data Channel) where display equipment identifies itself to the machine using it. This event triggers the presentation mode. The presentation mode is characterised by a trainable virtual desktop system with rules specific to presentations (as opposed to any rules for "ordinary" virtual desktops). These rules include a whitelist/blacklist of applications allowed into the foreground. They also define anything initiated by the user during the presentation should be in the foreground (unless a specific blacklist entry blocks it...