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Content Recognition Addressing Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000132491D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Dec-19
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Dec-19
Document File: 3 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The Content Recognition Addressing Method described in this article concerns the issue of addressing personal messages such as text messages or emails to people already in a personal or company address book. It can sometimes take a considerable period of time to search through a large address book, and can take several mouse movements to do so. This article proposes an easier method which uses text from the body of the message itself, to address the email without the need for a search through a list, or having to remember long email addresses for each person.

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Content Recognition Addressing Method

This submission concerns the issue of addressing personal messages such as text messages or emails to people already in a personal or company address book. It can sometimes take a considerable period of time to search through a large address book, and can take several mouse movements to do so. We propose an easier method which uses text from the body of the message itself, to address the email without the need for a search through a list, or having to remember long email addresses for each person.

    The current solution to addressing a message is obviously to search through a list (either an email address book or a list of phone numbers on a mobile telephone). This can take a long time (particularly with some of the UI's used by mobile phones). We believe the approach described here will speed up the process and make it more intuitive and user friendly.

    The key proposal is that once a name is typed into a message (either an email or an sms message), and if that name is also available in a predefined list (such as an address book), then there should be a fast method of addressing that message to that person.

    For example: In the case of an SMS message, if the message starts "Hi Chris...", when you go to send that message, there should be an option to search the phone book for a number, but on the same page also the option to send it straight to all the "Chris"'s in your phone book, without having to look through the phone book separately. If the word "Oliver" was also in the message, then you should also have an option to send it to him, as well as or instead of "Chris"

    In the case of email a similar situation could be envisaged. Any names that are typed into the body of the mail which are recognisable from the users address book (including any aliased names which could be set up by the address book owner so the name "Jordan Smith" could have aliases of "Jordan", "Jord", "Smith", "Jord Smith", "J Smith", "JS" etc. ) could be highlighted. Clicking on the names would bring up a small context menu, from which that name could be added to the "TO", "CC" or "BCC" fields of the email.

    The advantages over known solutions include: - Quicker completion of message addressing and sending - More intuitive addressing - No searching needed to find a name, no having to remember detailed phone numbers or email addresses to avoid searching.

    As a user types text into the body of the message the application (e.g. email client or SMS composing application) does a search of that word against a list of predefined names or aliases (usually stored in an address book or phone book and referred to as "keywords") after every complete word. Should the word which has just been typed match a keyword, then that keyword is added to a list (and may optionally be highlighted in the body of the text). Once that keyword is identified, it is added to a list of possible addressees for the message, and there should be provided a method...