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Hydrogels Comprising Enzymes and a Facile Method of Preparation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000132506D
Publication Date: 2005-Dec-19
Document File: 8 page(s) / 43K

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The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Dave A. Soerens: AUTHOR [+2]

Related Documents

WO 2004112851 A1: PATAPP

Abstract

This publication describes a method to immobilize biomolecules, such as active enzymes, within hydrogel compositions that are formed by a sol-gel crosslinking reaction under mild conditions. The mild crosslinking conditions are enabled by incorporation of silanols into a pre-polymerized, water-soluble polymer that can be blended with aqueous solutions of biomolecules and then crosslinked without heat or radiation to immobilize the functional biomolecules. The immobilized biomolecules hydrogel compositions have many uses, such as wound dressings, enzyme-mediated chemical transformations.

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Hydrogels Comprising Enzymes and a Facile Method of Preparation

   Dave A. Soerens Hoa La Wilhelm Kimberly-Clark Corporation

Abstract

This publication describes a method to immobilize biomolecules, such as active enzymes, within hydrogel compositions that are formed by a sol-gel crosslinking reaction under mild conditions. The mild crosslinking conditions are enabled by incorporation of silanols into a pre-polymerized, water-soluble polymer that can be blended with aqueous solutions of biomolecules and then crosslinked without heat or radiation to immobilize the functional biomolecules. The immobilized biomolecules hydrogel compositions have many uses, such as wound dressings, enzyme- mediated chemical transformations.

Benefits of the Technical Concept

Enzymes are used as catalysts in many industrial processes and analytical techniques. They exhibit a high degree of individual specificity as to substrate, and are highly efficient under mild operating conditions.

However, these materials suffer from a number of drawbacks. In particular, since many free enzymes are soluble in aqueous media, they can only be used once. Additionally, the deactivated enzyme remains in the product as a contaminant, which in certain instances may be undesirable. Enzymes are expensive materials and if the enzyme is lost in the process undertaken, then the process is essentially uneconomic.

It has been proposed to render enzymes water-insoluble, thereby providing a stable material that has prolonged enzymatic activity. The insolubilized material may be readily recovered from reaction mixtures, and subsequently reused. Many differing processes have been suggested for stabilization of enzymes by insolubilization.

Examples of such prior processes include adsorption onto solid materials, such as charcoal, glass and cellulose, entrapment in starch and acrylamide gels and covalent attachment between the enzymes and insoluble organic polymers (natural and synthetic) and inorganic carriers, such as nickel oxide and glass. Methods to immobilize enzymes onto organic, inorganic or polymeric

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surfaces have been based on adsorption, covalent binding to surfaces, entrapment in semi- permeable membranes, and microencapsulation into polymer microspheres and hydrogels.

Proteins have very particular chain configurations and conformations that promote high levels of specificity during chemical interactions. Because of this specificity of configuratation, efforts to immobilize enzymes suffer drawbacks generally associated with the enzymatic activity of the insoluble derivative. Many insolubilizing operations are carried out under conditions which affect adversely the enzymatic activity of the product. Often, the enzymatic activity of the derivative is considerably reduced as compared to that of an equivalent amount of the free enzyme. Furthermore, in cases where the enzymatic activity of the derivative is comparable with that of the free enzyme, this activity rapidl...