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Remote Control Productivity Improvement System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000132546D
Publication Date: 2005-Dec-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Daniel Ellingson: AUTHOR

Abstract

Many corporations advise their employees to turn off their computers or other electronically controlled devices before leaving work each day in order to reduce electrical costs. However, the lost work time waiting for computers to reboot the next day may be far more costly than the electricity. In order to reduce the wait time for employees returning to work when their jobs are computer intensive, an improved system is proposed in which an electrical signal is sent as an employee returns to or approaches the work place, and the signal automatically causes the employee's computer to start. The time between the receipt of the electrical signal and the arrival of the employee in his or her work space represents reduced wait time before the computer can be accessed.

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Remote Control Productivity Improvement System

   Daniel Ellingson Kimberly-Clark Corporation Neenah, Wisconsin

Many corporations advise their employees to turn off their computers or other electronically controlled devices before leaving work each day in order to reduce electrical costs. However, the lost work time waiting for computers to reboot the next day may be far more costly than the electricity. In order to reduce the wait time for employees returning to work when their jobs are computer intensive, an improved system is proposed in which an electrical signal is sent as an employee returns to or approaches the work place, and the signal automatically causes the employee's computer to start. The time between the receipt of the electrical signal and the arrival of the employee in his or her work space represents reduced wait time before the computer can be accessed.

The electrical signal may be sent by an RFID reader that reads an RFID tag (e.g., a passive tag) associated with the employee. In one version, the tag is attached to a photo ID, conventional access card, smart card for computer and building access, or badge and is read by a scanner at an entrance to the work place. In another version, the tag is an active RFID tag attached to the employee's automobile or carried by the employee, and the tag is read by a roadside RFID reader as vehicles enter the grounds of the workplace. Other wireless systems can also be adapted. For example, the signal may be sent via a cell phone that emits a predetermined signal readable by a corporate receiving station or that dials a specified number and then enters a code to activate the employee's computer, and/or other electronic devices, as specified by the employee. In some versions, the signal may be sent from home, from an employee's car, or from RFID readers located at places such as an entrance to a building or an entrance to a parking lot or campus.

Remotely turning on or otherwise activ...