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Novel Means of Detecting Blood Flow Near Skin Surface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000132548D
Publication Date: 2005-Dec-21
Document File: 3 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Gregory L. Bradley: ATTORNEY

Abstract

This invention is an improvement over current venous access technologies. Current venous access methods feature some type of imaging technology that is either displayed onto a screen that is remote from the injection site, or projected onto the skin of the injection site. The following invention allows for improved visualization of venous architecture in a low cost, disposable fashion for both the experienced and inexperienced clinical technician. Also, the IV Access Patch is more portable than other existing methods.

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Technical Publication No. 05-008

Novel Means of Detecting Blood Flow Near Skin Surface



Arun Ranchod, Page A. Cedarholm

This invention is an improvement over current venous access technologies.  Current venous access methods feature some type of imaging technology that is either displayed onto a screen that is remote from the injection site, or projected onto the skin of the injection site.  The following invention allows for improved visualization of venous architecture in a low cost, disposable fashion for both the experienced and inexperienced clinical technician.  Also, the IV Access Patch is more portable than other existing methods.

SPECIFICATION

The invention consists of a single "IV Access Patch" comprising the following:
An area of thermochromic liquid crystal sheeting (Mylar or other thin-film preparation) receptive to a temperature range of 32-38 degrees Celsius with sensitivity approximately 0.2 degrees Celsius. The sheeting may have numerous uniformly-spaced small holes through which a needle may pass directly to the skin.
The back of the liquid crystal sheeting section is coated with a substance that cools the skin and promotes thermal transfer; i.e., alcohol-based gel.
The edges of the sheeting are contained in some type of fabric that adheres to the skin (an adhesive).
In addition, the system includes a hand-held grip (a "squishy ball") that contains materials such that, when squeezed, initiates a controlled exothermic reaction (i.e., it gets warm)....