Browse Prior Art Database

SCROLLING USING VIRTUAL SCROLL WHEEL WITH INERTIAL AND FRICTION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000132570D
Publication Date: 2005-Dec-22
Document File: 3 page(s) / 126K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

KAM (KEUNG) FUNG: INVENTOR [+3]

Abstract

Background

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

SCROLLING USING "VIRTUAL SCROLL WHEEL WITH INERTIAL AND FRICTION"

Background

With the increase in popularity of p

or

table music players and mobile phones, there exist m

or

e and m

or

e p

or

table devices with large st

or

age capabilities, but relatively small displays. These devices have the capacity to st

or

e en

or

mous amount of data (up to 80 GB f

or

hard-disk drive-based products), and can easily st

or

e 10,000 items (e.g. songs, photos, video clips) or more. It is desirable f

or

users to be able to locate a particular item quickly and eff

or

tlessly. This is usually difficult with the usually limited number of buttons on the device, and it is not helped by the usually small display. Although these items are usually

or

ganized acc

or

ding to categ

or

ies (e.g. Artist, Album, Date, Folder), the user still needs to scan through numerous items bef

or

e a desired item is found. A good way to scroll through a large number of items on a relatively small display is desired.

The most rudimental approach is to use simple “up” and “down” buttons and scroll the items one by one. This w

or

ks, but is painfully slow f

or

large lists. An improvement on this is to scroll page-by-page after a certain number of individual scrollings. If the screen can display 8 items at the same time, f

or

example, scrolling page-by-page will speed up scrolling by 8 times. However, it would still take 1250 page scrolls to go through a list of 10,000 items.

The present solution is different from the conventional scheme of Alphabet Scrolling. Under this invention, each “page jump” can constitute the skipping of an alphabet, depending on the actual length of the list to be scrolled. This means not matter how long a list is, it can be scrolled from top to bottom with at most 30 to 40 “page jump”, depending on how punctuation and other symbols are grouped together.

Another solution, Apple’s iPod, for example, uses accelerated scrolling. This device uses an input mechanism that allows the user to indicate both desired direction of scrolling, and speed of scrolling. The number of items to be skipped depends on the length of the list, and the speed of scrolling. The user can thus scroll through a long list in a short time.

The above two examples, however, still require the user to actively hold down a button, or perform some actions (e.g. turning a scroll wheel), to

ind

icate his/her desire to continue scrolling. As soon as the user lifts the finger, scrolling stops. The current invention addresses this.

Gist of the invention

This invention requires the use of an inputting device, capable of...