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Method for an IHS with a heat-lane

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000144785D
Publication Date: 2007-Jan-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 265K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for an integrated heat spreader (IHS) with a heat-lane. Benefits include improved functionality and improved thermal performance.

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Method for an IHS with a heat-lane

Disclosed is a method for an integrated heat spreader (IHS) with a heat-lane. Benefits include improved functionality and improved thermal performance.

Background

      Conventionally, junction-to-case thermal resistance (Rjc) is reduced by optimizing the thickness of the IHS and/or developing a thermal interface material (TIM) with improved thermal conductivity. Additionally, the die can be thinned to improve heat conduction inside the silicon. However, thinning increases stress to the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) material and increases risk for handling, which can cause damage.

      Thermal resistance can be calculated using the following equation:

      The value k is thermal conductivity. The value L is length. The value S is cross-section area (thickness) of the thermal conductive material, such as copper.

      According to the formula, decreased thickness (lower L value) reduces the Rjc value. However, the result can be poor heat spreading due to a small cross-section area in the horizontal direction (see Figures 1 and 2).

      An alternative solution is a thin-die thin thermal interface material (TDTT), which reduces the thermal resistance inside the silicon (see Figure 3).

      The thermal conductivity is 120W/m.K for silicon. The thermal conductiv...