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Automatic wired and over-the-air synchronization of multiple local data copies from an original shared source

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000145249D
Publication Date: 2007-Jan-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 10K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

In some applications, a record copy is created from a source database and stored in the user's mailbox on the server or similar storage mechanism. This record is then synchronized over-the-air so that a second copy of that record is stored on the user's mobile device. Alternatively, it is first stored on the mobile device, and then synchronized with a server copy. The link to the original source is lost, however. It would be beneficial for the mobile copy to be synchronized in some way with the original source through a dependency, and have the ability to refresh or merge changes from that source when those changes occur.

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improved data synchronization


Automatic wired and over-the-air synchronization of multiple local data copies from an original shared source

Disclosed Anonymously

In some applications, a record copy is created from a source database and stored in the user's mailbox on the server or similar storage mechanism. This record is then synchronized over-the-air so that a second copy of that record is stored on the user's mobile device. Alternatively, it is first stored on the mobile device, and then synchronized with a server copy. The link to the original source is lost, however. It would be beneficial for the mobile copy to be synchronized in some way with the original source through a dependency, and have the ability to refresh or merge changes from that source when those changes occur.

An example is remote address lookup, where contact information is fetched from the corporate directory (global address list) on the Exchange server. If lookup is used to retrieve contact information, it can be stored in the device's address book. It is then synchronized with the personal contact database in Outlook through the data sync protocol. However, both these copies are no longer associated with the source record which lives in the global address list. If an employee's office number changes, for instance, then the device is not informed. The user would need to periodically perform lookups on all contacts to retrieve the most up-to-date information, which is obviously impractical.

The solution is to be able to detect changes in the source record, and then noti...