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Drilling Fluids Using PTFE Powder As A Lubricating Agent and Methods of Drilling in Subterranean Formations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000145399D
Publication Date: 2007-Jan-15
Document File: 8 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This invention relates to a method of preventing or controlling the loss of well drilling fluids into subterranean formations penetrated by a drill bit, while simultaneously reducing the frictional forces and wear during drilling in a subterranean formation. More particularly, the present invention relates to the use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fluoropolymer resin powder or aqueous powder suspension as a drilling fluid additive for such purposes. Examples of such resins are commercially available products from DuPont under the tradename Zonyl; Shamrock Technologies under the tradenames NanaFLON and Fluro; and Dyneon (subsidiary of 3M) under the trade name TF920 05/07. PTFE (Teflon) has been used for years in many applications where increased lubricity is desirable. In this case, the use of PTFE micro-powder (particle size 4-12 ┬Ám) is added to the base fluid used to formulate a drilling fluid. The PTFE micro-powder is dispersed into the drilling fluid using a surfactant. The drilling fluid is then used in drilling in a subterranean formation. The addition of PTFE micro-powder increases lubricity; therefore reducing torque, drag, and increasing the rate of penetration.

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Drilling Fluids Using PTFE Powder As A Lubricating Agent and Methods of Drilling in Subterranean Formations

ABSTRACT

This invention relates to a method of preventing or controlling the loss of well drilling fluids into subterranean formations penetrated by a drill bit, while simultaneously reducing the frictional forces and wear during drilling in a subterranean formation. More particularly, the present invention relates to the use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fluoropolymer resin powder or aqueous powder suspension as a drilling fluid additive for such purposes. Examples of such resins are commercially available products from DuPont under the tradename Zonyl; Shamrock Technologies under the tradenames NanaFLON and Fluro; and Dyneon (subsidiary of 3M) under the trade name TF920 05/07. PTFE (Teflon) has been used for years in many applications where increased lubricity is desirable. In this case, the use of PTFE micro-powder (particle size 4-12 µm) is added to the base fluid used to formulate a drilling fluid. The PTFE micro-powder is dispersed into the drilling fluid using a surfactant. The drilling fluid is then used in drilling in a subterranean formation. The addition of PTFE micro-powder increases lubricity; therefore reducing torque, drag, and increasing the rate of penetration.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to drilling fluid additives used to drill in subterranean formations. More particularly, but not by way of limitation, this invention relates to drilling fluid additives preventing or controlling the loss of well drilling fluids into subterranean formations penetrated by a drill bit, while simultaneously reducing the frictional forces and wear during drilling in a subterranean formation.

In the exploration and development of hydrocarbon reservoirs, operators are usually required to drill bore holes by means of a rotating bit. A drilling fluid is necessary in order to effectively drill the bore hole. The drilling fluid, which is sometimes called "mud", is many times a mixture of water, clay, weighting material, and certain chemical additives.

Drilling fluids may be oil based, water based, or invert emulsions to give the drilling mud certain desirable properties. A drilling fluid serves very important functions. For instance, the drilling fluid is used to raise the cuttings made by the bit and lift them to the surface for disposal. But equally important, the drilling fluid also provides a means for keeping reservoir pressures in check. Other chemicals may also be added in order give the fluid the specific properties needed for particular wells.

Oil has been used as a lubricant in drilling fluids for many years. The oil prevents sticking of the work string and increases rate of penetration. Oil is also useful in controlling hole erosion, which in turn causes gauge problems within t...