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Method for a portable session-based bandwidth control mechanism for Linux

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000146683D
Publication Date: 2007-Feb-19
Document File: 5 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a portable session-based bandwidth control mechanism for Linux. Benefits include improved functionality and improved performance.

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Method for a portable session-based bandwidth control mechanism for Linux

Disclosed is a method for a portable session-based bandwidth control mechanism for Linux. Benefits include improved functionality and improved performance.

Background

      Linux is an operating system that is used as a network gateway. Linux hand-held devices can form a spontaneous personal wireless network. This type of network conventionally lacks center bandwidth controllers (routers), so bandwidth control can only be achieved by end-node cooperation. However, Linux does not have an end-node bandwidth control mechanism (see Figure 1).

      With Linux, socket system calls are the interface of the network subsystem. Applications use a C programming language library to access the socket system calls. When a socket call is passed to the kernel, the call is processed by several layers. The Linux networking stack is demonstrated in Figure 1. There is no bandwidth control mechanism on the path.

      Linux kernel revision 2.4.32 was released November 16, 2005 by LinuxHQ. Linux kernel revision 2.6.15 was released January 3, 2006 by LinuxHQ. “The Single UNIX Specification Version 3”, IEEE Standard 1003.1, 2004 Edition was approved by The Open Group.

General description

      The disclosed method is a portable session-based bandwidth control mechanism for Linux. The method includes a Linux session-based bandwidth-control library (LSBL). Developers can implement a policy system based on LSBL to form a whole bandwidth solution.

      LSBL is portable. It is implemented in user-space and does not depend on kernel application program interfaces (APIs). LSBL is implemented using the single UNIX standard, so LSBL can be easily ported from Linux kernel 2.4 to 2.6 and other UNIX variants.

      The key elements of the disclosed method include:
•     Dynamic library preload mechanism

•     In-memory shared database

•     Traffic shaping

•     Linux session-based bandwidth-control library

Advantages

      The disclosed method provides advantages, including:
•     Improved functionality due to providing a portable session-based bandwidth control mechanism for Linux

•     Improved functionality due to providing locking and non-blocking I/O modes
•     Improved functionality due to being portable from Linux kernel 2.4 to 2.6 and other UNIX variants

•     Improved functionality due to supporting a multiple-level policy system

•     Improved performance due to controlling the end-nodes’ bandwidth usage at the session level

Detailed description

      The disclosed method is LSBL. It is a dynamic library that functions between the network application and a C library on Linux. The method intercepts the application networking input/output (I/O) operation and con...