Browse Prior Art Database

Wireless Data Synchronization For Vehicles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000146915D
Original Publication Date: 2007-Feb-27
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2007-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a process to enable data synchronization between a device inside a vehicle and a device outside the vehicle via a local wireless network. Currently, sychronization schemes are manually started by the operator or started at predetermined times by a job scheduler. A solution is needed that does not require any manual intervention by the operator and synchronizes in a more timely manner over a job scheduler.

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Wireless Data Synchronization For Vehicles

Disclosed is a process to enable data synchronization between a device inside a vehicle and a device outside the vehicle via a local wireless network. Vehicles may have a number of integrated and non-integrated devices that store data and have wireless capabilities. In the commercial space, for example, a vehicle may house an integrated computer device that shows the operator delivery addresses for that particular day. In the consumer space, for example, a vehicle may be connected to a non-integrated, hand-held MP3 audio player. Over time, the data on said devices becomes stale or obsolete. Today, synchronization schemes are manually started by the operator or started at predetermined times by a job scheduler. A solution is needed that does not require any manual intervention by the operator and synchronizes in a more timely manner over a job scheduler.

     MP3 are popular consumer electronics. Many are hand-held devices in form. Size of the device and cost of storage are limiting factors in how much data the device can store. In one example, the device can hold one-tenth of the operator's overall music library. The device can be connected to the operator's vehicle audio system. The connection charges the MP3 device and allows the device to play audio over the vehicles speakers. Over time, the data on the device becomes stale in that the operator becomes bored with hearing the same music over and over. Traditionally, the operator would have to disconnect the device from his vehicle, take it to his computer, synchronize with new data, take it back to his vehicle, re-connect the device to his vehicle. A solution is needed to remove the burden of remembering to synchronize and the act of performing a manual synchronization from the operator.

     Commercial vehicles may have onboard, integrated computers that help the operators perform their job. In one example, the computer stores the delivery schedules and associate maps for each address. Delivery orders are created and cancelled throughout the day. The delivery company wants to update the operators' computers each time they return to the depot to reflect the dynamic schedules. Traditionally, a technical person would have to go to each vehicle and manually update each computer as it returned to the depot several times per day. This is very manual in nature and too cumbersome of a process to maintain. Wide-area wireless networks are available, but they are only available in select areas and are comparatively expensive to subscribe to...