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ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 1977-78

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000148243D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2007-Mar-29

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Hartmanis, J.: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

ANNUAL REPORT 170R THE ACADEMIC YEAR 1977-78The Department of Computer Science Cornell University June 1978 by J. Hartmanis, Chairman Page Section I I1 1.1 I I V v VI V I I VIII I X Computer Science in 1977/78 1 Educational Facilities 3 Student Enrollment 4 Faculty 6 Instruction and Research Staff 1977-78 7 Staff Activities 9 Research Grants 25 List of Visitors 2 9 ~istof Technical Reports 31 I. Computer Science in 1977/78 Contrary to the national trends in many other academicfields, the interest, research support and demand for people trained in computer science is still growing. Even a casual observer of the computer field this year would realize, lookingat the special issues of Scientific American and Science dedicated to micro-electronics and computer and the Time magazine coverstory about the "miracle chip", that the rapid growth of computing is fueled by another technological revolution. These developments are further emphasizing the need for a profound understanding of the nature of computational processes, they are creating a wealth of new and unexpected applications of information processing, and all this is increasing the demand for people trained in computer science. Not surprisingly, the job opportunities for computer scientists were exceptionally good this year. The demand for new Ph.D.s in computer science was even higher than expected becauseof vigorous recruiting by industry, and the competition for the best people was fierce. It seems that these trends will continue for a considerable time and that computing and computers will per- meate and change our society to an even higher degree than expected up till now.

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ANNUAL REPORT 170R THE ACADEMIC YEAR
1977-78
The Department of Computer Science

Cornell University
June 1978
by

J. Hartmanis, Chairman

Page

Section
I
I1
1.1
I

I V

v

VI

V I I VIII

I X

Computer Science in 1977/78 1 Educational Facilities 3
Student Enrollment 4
Faculty 6
Instruction and Research Staff 1977-78 7
Staff Activities 9
Research Grants 25 List of Visitors 2 9
~ist
of Technical Reports 31

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Page 2 of 18

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I. Computer Science in 1977/78

    Contrary to the national trends in many other academic
fields, the interest, research support and demand for people
trained in computer science is still growing. Even a casual
observer of the computer field this year would realize, looking
at the special issues of Scientific American and Science dedicated
to micro-electronics and computer and the Time magazine cover
story about the "miracle chip", that the rapid growth of computing
is fueled by another technological revolution. These developments
are further emphasizing the need for a profound understanding of
the nature of computational processes, they are creating a wealth
of new and unexpected applications of information processing, and
all this is increasing the demand for people trained in computer
science. Not surprisingly, the job opportunities for computer
scientists were exceptionally good this year. The demand for new
Ph.D.s in computer science was even higher than expected because
of vigorous recruiting by industry, and the competition for the
best people was fierce. It seems that these trends will continue
for a considerable time and that computing and computers will per-
meate and change our society to an even higher degree than expected
up till now.

    At Cornell we continue to be fortunate in being able to
maintain an interesting and productive working environment.

Our courses are well attended: ed 57 courses during

P--

1977/78 attended by over 2500 students. We awarded five Ph.D.

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degrees and eight Master's degrees. Our Ph.D. and Master's
degree holders find no difficulty in obtaining fine offers of
employment after graduation. The faculty remained very active
during the year. Some seventy lectures or lecture courses vere
delivered outside the Cniversity, and &out 30 research papers
were published during the year. Me are able to maintain fine
working conditions and attract high quality faculty and stulents.
We still receive almost ten times as many applications for admis-
sion to our graduate program as there is space available for study.
Next year we will have 14 new graduate students, including tv;o

          7 / with NSF fellowships, one withx=ite fellowship and one
with a DAAD fellowship from West Germany.

   During the year we installed a departmental research conputer,
a PDP 11/60, purchased with a National Science Foundation grant.
The Com...