Browse Prior Art Database

Computer-Assisted Office Work -- A Perspective

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000148793D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Aug-02
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2007-Mar-30
Document File: 24 page(s) / 1M

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Gruhn, Ann M.: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

RC 7242 (#31189) 08/02/78 Computing Systems 19 pages Research Report Computer-Assisted Office Work A Perspective 4 8 Ann M. Grultn Ann Carol Hohl IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 , Research Division . , Yorktown San Jose Zurich Computer-Assisted Office Work A Perspective AM M. Gruhn Ann Carol Hohl IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 AB!3TRACT: The integrated office system of the future that relies upon computerized applications for most routine work will have to be a friendly system that can be used by individuals with a minimum of training and no . previous computing experience. A discussion of the-computer-assistehids to office work that have evolved at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research . Center provides a preview of the possibilities for future office systems. We describe tasks that can be computerized, the environment in which they are used, the training involved, the problems encountered, and the reactions of the people we have advised.

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RC 7242 (#31189) 08/02/78 Computing Systems 19 pages

Research Report

Computer-Assisted Office Work -

A Perspective

4 8

Ann M. Grultn Ann Carol Hohl

IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center Yorktown Heights, New York 10598

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Yorktown - San Jose - Zurich

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Computer-Assisted Office Work -

AM M. Gruhn

- Ann Carol Hohl

IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center Yorktown Heights, New York 10598

 AB!3TRACT: The integrated office system of the future that relies upon computerized applications for most routine work will have to be a friendly system that can be used by individuals with a minimum of training and no
. previous computing experience. A discussion of the-computer-assistehids
to office work that have evolved at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research .

Center provides a preview of the possibilities for future office systems. We describe tasks that can be computerized, the environment in which they are used, the training involved, the problems encountered, and the reactions of the people we have advised.

Formatted using the Yorktown Formatting Language Printed on the experimental printer

IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center Yorktown Heights, New Kork 10598

A Perspective

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LIMITED DISTRIBUTION NOTICE

This report has been submitted for publication elsewhere and
has been issued as a Research Report for early dissemination
of its contents. As a courtesy to the intended publisher, it should not be widely distributed until after the date of outside publication.

Copies may be requested from:


IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center Post Office Box 218
Yorktown Heights, New York 10598

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Page 1

S%LECTION OF COMPUTERIZED AIDS

The most difficult decision the designer of automated office aids faces is the selection of functions to be computerized. One must decide not only what to put on the comput- er, but more significantly how to do it. Fur- thermore a good explanation'of why a par- ticular task should be selected must be available to allay any fears on the part of future users. The computerized function must be natural to use and must not perturb the remaining manual procedures. The suc- cess of an integrated office system depends on haw well its designers succeed in build- ing a usable human interface.

The following criteria can be applied to tasks to determine whether they are good candidates for a computer application. A YES answer to any of these questions indi- cates a likely candidate.

Is the task a simple, repetitive sequence affecting data, and is this sequence ex- ecuted often?

Is there a sizeable and/o...