Browse Prior Art Database

Improved navigation of video through automatic segmentation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000162094D
Original Publication Date: 2008-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2008-Jan-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Since most audio/video assets (except for DVDs) do not come with predefined offsets to timecodes relating to relevant events within the asset, it is difficult for the user to access certain chapters or contents within the audio/video asset. The following idea provides a method to breaking video/audio asset into up to ten segments and tying those segments to the numeric pad on the remote control or other input device. This provides a "chapter experience" and one-touch access to the asset chapters. Most other systems provide for random access within an asset by one of the following methods: 1. Entering in an explicit timecode (e.g. 13:00) to jump to. 2. Entering in a relative offset (e.g. 13:00 plus jump key) to jump ahead 13:00 from current position.

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Improved navigation of video through automatic segmentation

Idea: Thomas E. Cezeaux, US-Bothell, WA; Loc V. Nguyen, US-Bothell, WA

Since most audio/video assets (except for DVDs) do not come with predefined offsets to timecodes relating to relevant events within the asset, it is difficult for the user to access certain chapters or contents within the audio/video asset. The following idea provides a method to breaking video/audio asset into up to ten segments and tying those segments to the numeric pad on the remote control or other input device. This provides a "chapter experience" and one-touch access to the asset chapters. Most other systems provide for random access within an asset by one of the following methods:
1. Entering in an explicit timecode (e.g. 13:00) to jump to.
2. Entering in a relative offset (e.g. 13:00 plus jump key) to jump ahead 13:00 from current position.

3. Having a predefined relative offset (e.g. 30 seconds) and using a key (e.g. Jump) to move forwards by that amount of time.

Many existing systems do not provide for random access and only provide for linear access through standard Fast Forward/Rewind features that play the asset at different speeds (e.g. Fast Forward is 8x normal speed).

The following is proposed: An audio or video asset, whose length can be determined, is divided up into sections representing a fracti...