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The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) and Spam (RFC5039)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000166232D
Original Publication Date: 2008-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2008-Jan-05
Document File: 29 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Rosenberg: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Spam, defined as the transmission of bulk unsolicited messages, has plagued Internet email. Unfortunately, spam is not limited to email. It can affect any system that enables user-to-user communications. The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) defines a system for user-to- user multimedia communications. Therefore, it is susceptible to spam, just as email is. In this document, we analyze the problem of spam in SIP. We first identify the ways in which the problem is the same and the ways in which it is different from email. We then examine the various possible solutions that have been discussed for email and consider their applicability to SIP.

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Network Working Group                                       J. Rosenberg Request for Comments: 5039                                   C. Jennings Category: Informational                                            Cisco                                                             January 2008

              The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) and Spam

Status of This Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does    not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this    memo is unlimited.

Abstract

   Spam, defined as the transmission of bulk unsolicited messages, has    plagued Internet email.  Unfortunately, spam is not limited to email.    It can affect any system that enables user-to-user communications.    The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) defines a system for user-to-    user multimedia communications.  Therefore, it is susceptible to    spam, just as email is.  In this document, we analyze the problem of    spam in SIP.  We first identify the ways in which the problem is the    same and the ways in which it is different from email.  We then    examine the various possible solutions that have been discussed for    email and consider their applicability to SIP.

Rosenberg & Jennings         Informational                      [Page 1]
 RFC 5039                        SIP Spam                    January 2008

 Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3

   2.  Problem Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3

     2.1.  Call Spam  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4

     2.2.  IM Spam  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7

     2.3.  Presence Spam  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7

   3.  Solution Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8

     3.1.  Content Filtering  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8

     3.2.  Black Lists  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9

     3.3.  White Lists  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9

     3.4.  Consent-Based Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

     3.5.  Reputation Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

     3.6.  Address Obfuscation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

     3.7.  Limited-Use Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

     3.8.  Turing Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

     3.9.  Computational Puzzles  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

     3.10. Payments at Risk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....