Browse Prior Art Database

Group and control by container

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000166653D
Original Publication Date: 2008-Jan-18
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2008-Jan-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is software which allows operators to better organize, group, and control containers and container items. A container can be thought of as an ecosystem. For example, containers can be Java virtual machines (JVM) and virtual machine software. This disclosure will enable operators to readily determine which applications belong to which container.

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Group and control by container

Disclosed is software which allows operators to better organize, group, and control containers and container items. A container can be thought of as an ecosystem. For example, containers can be Java virtual machines (JVM) and virtual machine software. This disclosure will enable operators to readily determine which applications belong to which container.

In select versions of the Microsoft Windows operating system, there is a taskbar feature named "Group similar taskbar buttons". This feature helps organize taskbar items by grouping the items. For example, imagine that an operator starts two "notepad" applications. Normally, the operator would see two separate "notepad" entries on the taskbar. However, with "Group similar taskbar buttons" enabled, the operator only sees one "notepad" entry on the taskbar named "2 Notepad". If the operator clicks the "2 Notepad" entry, it will expand to show the two "notepad" entries the operator would normally find on the taskbar.

This disclosure teaches that taskbar items can be grouped by container. For example, imagine that an operator had four "notepad" applications running. "Notepad" instance #1 is running in the local environment. "Notepad" instance #2 and #3 is running in Java virtual machine #1. "Notepad" instance #4 is running in Java virtual machine #2. Normally, the operator would see four separate "notepad" entries on the taskbar. However, with this disclosure, the operator sees three entries named "notepad", "2 JVM-a", and "1 JVM-b". The first "notepad" entry is the "notepad" application running in the normal, local environment. The "2 JVM-a" entry indicates to the operator that there are...