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An arrangement in a bolted joint

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000168041D
Publication Date: 2008-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

ABSTRACT In vehicles in motion, bolted joints with spacers are exposed to different forces or loads that cause relative movements between the clamped members of the joints and that, in the end, can lead to failure of the bolt, particularly when it is exposed to an asymmetrical load caused by forces that act to tear the clamped members of the joint apart. By dividing the spacers on the respective side of the joint into two adjoining spacers, one on top of the other, whose contact surfaces are made spherical to enable sliding relative movements between the two spacers, they can adjust their mutual positions to any force or load that tends to tear the clamped members of the joint apart and, hereby, prevent the bolt from being asymmetrically loaded.

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An arrangement in a bolted joint

In vehicles such as trucks, a number of bolted joints are used to clamp two metal members together. The number of bolted joints can amount to between 250 and 500 in each vehicle.

In a bolted joint, a bolt is inserted through a hole in both members and the members are then clamped together between the head of the bolt and a nut screwed on to the threaded end of the bolt.

To increase the so called clamped length of the joint, a spacer in the form of an annular cylinder is often provided on the bolt between the head of the bolt and one member as well as between the nut and the other member.

In vehicles in motion, the bolted joints with spacers are exposed to different forces or loads that cause relative movements between the clamped members and that, in the end, can lead to failure of the bolt.

The most common cause of failure of the bolt with spacers is when it is exposed to an asymmetrical load caused by forces that act to tear the clamped members of the joint apart. Stress concentrations at the transition between the bolt shank and the bolt head or the nut will cause the failure of the bolt.

This problem with bolted joints with spacers is solved by dividing the spacers, i.e. the annular cylinders, on the respective side of the joint into two adjoining spacers, i.e. annular cylinders, one on top of the other, whose contact surfaces are made spherical to enable sliding relative movements b...