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Acoustic Doors for an Advanced TCA Shelf

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000170001D
Published in the IP.com Journal: Volume 8 Issue 5B (2008-06-03)
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2008-Jun-03
Document File: 4 page(s) / 224K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

In forced air cooled systems, which comprise high energy dissipating equipment such as Advanced TCA shelves (Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture shelves), acoustic noise emission limits can not be met by using standard racks/shelters. Noise power levels are standardized for many equipment environments and have defined limits. However, the temperature range on the blades has to be reduced to protect them from thermal stress. Thus, a certain air volume per time is required for cooling. To keep the temperature of the components within the limits, high performance blades provide big heat sinks, which increase the pressure drop of the blade. Therefore, the forced air cooling equipment has to cope with the pressure drop and deliver the required air volume per time for the blade. Depending on the air volume per time and the pressure required for the cooling blade, the acoustic noise emission of the shelf is finally determined by the fans which are predefined by the equipment design dimensions of the shelf and the characteristics of the fans.

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Acoustic Doors for an Advanced TCA Shelf

Idea: Dieter Schwab, DE-Munich; Silvio Buffalino, DE-Munich; Ali-Ihsan Can, DE-Munich; Server-

Ibrahim Gezmis, FI-Espoo

In forced air cooled systems, which comprise high energy dissipating equipment such as Advanced TCA shelves (Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture shelves), acoustic noise emission limits can not be met by using standard racks/shelters. Noise power levels are standardized for many equipment environments and have defined limits. However, the temperature range on the blades has to be reduced to protect them from thermal stress. Thus, a certain air volume per time is required for cooling. To keep the temperature of the components within the limits, high performance blades provide big heat sinks, which increase the pressure drop of the blade. Therefore, the forced air cooling equipment has to cope with the pressure drop and deliver the required air volume per time for the blade. Depending on the air volume per time and the pressure required for the cooling blade, the acoustic noise emission of the shelf is finally determined by the fans which are predefined by the equipment design dimensions of the shelf and the characteristics of the fans.

Current noise suppression of high energy dissipation equipment is achieved either by using different cooling mechanisms (e.g. water cooling) or by providing adequate measures on rack/shelter level. In current designs with fixed equipment practice and fans, this leads to the problem that either high performance boards can not be used or the performance of a board has to be degraded to meet the acoustic noise limits. On the other hand, using boards with lower performance leads to the necessity of using more boards which increases the costs. In Figure 1 an example of a current shelf is shown. Figure 2 depicts the mounting of the shelf and the air flow within a standard rack. The shelter provides openings for air inlet and air outlet. An alternative is the use of water cooled systems, with the disadvantage that they are expensive and often not accepted by the customers.

In the following, it is proposed to elongate the path of the cooling air based on the the exhaust pipe principle. Additionally, a sound suppression foam is attached to the shelf level air inlet/outlet openings. This acoustic foam can be either a simple foam, which will provide sound absorbability, or a specific acoustic foam, which provides a frequency specific sound absorption capability. Depending on the acoustic noise measures, acoustic doors can be used either front or rear or on both sides to redu...