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Bit Error Rate Estimation (BER) Based on Frame Loss Rate (FLR) Measurements

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000170006D
Original Publication Date: 2008-Jun-03
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2008-Jun-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 211K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

The Bit Error Rate (BER) is a measure of quality of data transmission in networks. Usually, the Bit Error Rate is estimated since only certain information such as Frame Loss Rate (FLR) is available. Up to now, a separate BER monitoring device is used to estimate the BER for link monitoring purposes.

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Bit Error Rate Estimation (BER) Based on Frame Loss Rate (FLR) Measurements

Idea: Dr. Dominic Schupke, DE-Muenchen; Dr. Matthieu Clouqueur, DE-Muenchen

The Bit Error Rate (BER) is a measure of quality of data transmission in networks. Usually, the Bit Error Rate is estimated since only certain information such as Frame Loss Rate (FLR) is available. Up to now, a separate BER monitoring device is used to estimate the BER for link monitoring purposes.

Therefore, a novel method is proposed which estimates the BER of a transmission link based solely on the measured FLR and optionally on the observed frame size (since data frames are transmitted). First, the FLR is calculated and as the frame size is recorded over a period of time (T) by the proposed Link Monitoring Apparatus (s. Figure 1). The period of time is adjustable and the frame size is evaluated statistically. Subject to the statistics of the frame size, formulas and correspondence tables are used to estimate the BER. Since the precision of the estimation of the BER depends on the frame size statistics, different cases in regard to the frame size distribution have to be covered by the proposed solution. In the first case a fixed frame size is assumed. Thus, the relation between FLR and

BER is or equally

L

         BER FLR )

  1
( 1 −

  − = L FLR

BER − − = 1

                           1 . If the frame size can be statistically evaluated, the average frame size can be used as the L value. If the frame size can not be statistically evaluated, the minimum frame size defined by the transmission format (e.g. 64 bytes for Ethernet) is used. In Figure 2 the lower and higher bounds of the actual BER are depicted (the frame size is constant). The higher bound of the BER is connected to a frame size of 64 bytes and the lower bound to a frame size of 1500 bytes. For all values of the FLR, a factor of about 22 between the higher and lower bound can be acceptable for an estimation of the BER. In the second case, a multi-modal distribution of the frame size is assumed. If multiple values are allowed for the frame length, the relation between FLR and BER can be described as in the following example with thre...