Browse Prior Art Database

Using the Speed Bump Concept to Guide the On-screen Cursor in Aviation Displays

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000170038D
Publication Date: 2008-May-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 104K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This innovation is the application of a “speed bump” concept to displays in general and aviation displays in particular. The speed bump is a feature that splits a single display into two segregated halves. The cursor is blocked from passing the vertical speed bump barrier unless a deliberate motion is initiated immediately following the blockage of the cursor at the border. This innovation is designed to ease navigation to the main menu button (conceptually located in the upper left corner of the window). Currently, the user needs to navigate both x and y directions in order to select the main menu button. This innovation suggests that a speed bump algorithm is altered such that the speed bump will behave like the edge of an LCD screen: i.e. the cursor moves to the LCD edge and all further movement in that direction will be ignored. If the cursor is slewed rapidly to the left (x) hitting the speed bump, then rapidly upward (y), the cursor will be located on top of the main menu button, without the operator having to track the cursor via rapid slewing.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 76% of the total text.

Using the Speed Bump Concept to Guide the On-Screen Cursor in Aviation Displays

Statement of the Problem

Modern glass cockpits utilize an onscreen cursor manipulated by a cursor control device.  Manipulating the cursor involves tracking the motion of the cursor control device to the on-screen cursor in two directions, x and y.  This tracking task requires significant workload resources, even to access common functions, like the main menu button.

Proposed Solution

This innovation is the application of a “speed bump” concept to displays in general and aviation displays in particular.  The speed bump is a feature that splits a single display into two segregated halves.  The cursor is blocked from passing the vertical speed bump barrier unless a deliberate motion is initiated immediately following stopping the cursor at the border.  This innovation is designed to ease navigation to the main menu button (conceptually located in the upper left corner of the window).  Currently, the user needs to navigate both x and y directions in order to select the main menu button.  See Figure 1.  This innovation suggests that a speed bump algorithm is altered such that the speed bump will behave like the edge of an LCD screen: i.e. the cursor moves to the LCD edge and all further movement in that direction will be ignored.  If the cursor is slewed...