Browse Prior Art Database

METHOD FOR ASSURING QUALITY OF EXPERIENCE IN AN IP COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000173686D
Original Publication Date: 2008-Aug-20
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2008-Aug-20
Document File: 6 page(s) / 240K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Matthew Keller: INVENTOR [+2]

Abstract

A means for managing the media quality as experienced by the end user and assuring that it meets the user's requirements and the appropriate resource prioritization requirements in an IP communication system is described in this publication. The solution admits and maintains flows based on a required value for a media quality level metric and based on ability to meet the Quality of Experience (QoE) assuredness requirement. It uses media quality level metrics from associated flows (ex. those on the same wireless access node) to understand where resources may be available during admission requests. Using current media quality level metrics, media quality level requirements, and relative flow priorities from associated flows (ex. those on the same AP) the solution makes preemption and media parameter adjustment decisions in order to maintain a media quality level metric at the required value. Additionally, using desired media quality level values, the solution determines resources that are available for reassignment.

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METHOD FOR ASSURING QUALITY OF EXPERIENCE IN AN IP COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM

By Matthew Keller, Donald Newberg

Motorola, Inc.

Government and Public Safety

 

ABSTRACT

A means for managing the media quality as experienced by the end user and assuring that it meets the user’s requirements and the appropriate resource prioritization requirements in an IP communication system is described in this publication.

The solution admits and maintains flows based on a required value for a media quality level metric and based on ability to meet the Quality of Experience (QoE) assuredness requirement.  It uses media quality level metrics from associated flows (ex. those on the same wireless access node) to understand where resources may be available during admission requests.

Using current media quality level metrics, media quality level requirements, and relative flow priorities from associated flows (ex. those on the same AP) the solution makes preemption and media parameter adjustment decisions in order to maintain a media quality level metric at the required value.  Additionally, using desired media quality level values, the solution determines resources that are available for reassignment.

PROBLEM

As public safety customers move to adopt wireless broadband data applications and streaming services such as voice and video, they will bring with them a set of relatively high expectations for the quality of those media services.  Public safety customers will require high media quality for their use cases.  Especially important is that the media quality is consistent – it cannot oscillate from good to bad to good throughout the lifetime of the call.  Public safety has historically shown that this causes frustration with the application which results in it not being used.  It is believed that being able to maintain good media quality as experienced by the end user is especially important for video calls which are resource intensive, making it difficult to maintain consistent QoS.  Additionally, video calls are typically of long duration which means that the system cannot rely on correcting issues when the next call starts.

Prioritization is important in public safety communications, where the relative importance of communication can vary dramatically (ex. retail theft investigation vs. the building is about to collapse).  The system must assure that network resources are assigned to the highest priority communications and must adapt as those priorities change.  Additionally, the system must manage network traffic of many different types of media (ex. voice, video, and data) and from many different sourcing applications.

Another consideration is that media quality is based on human perceptions and is generally relative to the particular directed goals that they have at the time.  Today’s QoS mechanisms for broadband n...