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Method for Indicating Appropriate Location for Pushing/Pressing When Printed Labels Can't Cover Traces or Components

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000175788D
Original Publication Date: 2008-Oct-25
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2008-Oct-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This invention teaches a method of using a label that partially suspends over (or bridges over) a sensitive area when a printed label cannot be in constant contact with that area of the card or board. This label still successfully indicates to users the appropriate location for them to press or push on during an installation task. This label would accommodate the design constraint that prohibits constant contact with the component or section of the board.

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Method for Indicating Appropriate Location for Pushing /Pressing When Printed Labels Can't Cover Traces or Components

Background
1a. Upgrading/repairing computer hardware often requires the installation of new hardware components. Many components require pushing/pressing in a particular location for proper, safe installation and avoidance of product damage.
1b. The appropriate location for pushing/pressing can be indicated through either an afforance that indicates such action or a label that indicates where such action should occur.

Existing Solutions
1c. Typically, a printed label indicating the appropriate location(s) for pushing/pressing can be adhered directly to the appropriate location on the component itself, i.e. a flat label on a flat surface.
1d. However, when a printed label cannot be in constant contact with the board, a label can be placed in a proximate-location to indicate the appropriate location. However, even a well-designed, proximately-located label can leave ambiguity regarding proper installation actions if the label is not located in the exact location where a component should be pushed/pressed.

Invention
2a. This invention teaches a method of using a label that partially suspends over (or bridges over) a sensitive area when a printed label cannot be in constant contact with that area of the card or board. This label still s...