Browse Prior Art Database

Automated System and Method for Entering Time and Location Information

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000178105D
Publication Date: 2009-Jan-15
Document File: 6 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Michael B. Jonely: INVENTOR [+5]

Abstract

This system and method eliminates the need for a user to manually enter time and/or location information into a non-navigational electronic device (e.g., a sensor, an instrument, a receiver, or the like). In one embodiment, a device wirelessly receives and stores the time and location information from a LORAN signal. In addition, the device can supply the time and location information to another electronic device (e.g., a clock, a radio, a television, a VCR, a DVR, or the like) during initial setup and updates of the device.

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AUTomated System and Method for Entering

Time and Location INFORMATION

background

[0001]               The present invention relates to an automated system and method for entering time and location information into a device.

[0002]               Some devices (e.g., sensors, instruments, receivers) require time and location information during initial setup.  Currently, there are several methods by which a device can obtain time and location information.  One traditional method includes a user manually entering the information during the initial setup and then periodically updating the information, as needed.  Several other methods to simplify or eliminate this manual entry of information have also been used.  For example, some televisions and devices for recording TV broadcasts (e.g., VCRs, DVRs, or the like) receive time from public broadcasting stations.

[0003]               Automated methods have also been employed to enter time and location information into a device.  For example, WWVB uses a single 50,000 Watt (W) transmitter at

Fort Collins

,

Colorado

to transmit a radio signal including time information.  Global positioning systems (GPS) have also been used to transmit time and location information.  However, these systems have their limitations.  The WWVB signal does not contain location information and is very limited during the day.  At night, when the WWVB signal is strongest, there are still many areas (e.g., the east coast, mountain areas, areas near mineral deposits or buildings, etc.), where signal reception is poor, intermittent, or non-existent.  Likewise, metals and many construction materials, such as, for example, Low-E glass, can interfere with and/or block a GPS signal.  As a result, GPS may not be usable or reliable for many indoor applications.

[0004]               The LORAN (LOng RAnge Navigation) system is a multi-station system that operates on the 100 kilohertz (kHz) radio frequency band.  LORAN-C was originally set up during World War II as a navigation system for ships in coastal waters.  Recently, this system has been upgraded to eLORAN, which includes time information in its broadcast.  Unlike the WWVB signal that is broadcast from a single station, the LORAN signal is broadcast from a network of stations, some of which transmit at powers over one million watts.  Typically, the LORAN system has been used for water navigation, especially coastal water navigation, and as a backup for the GPS system when the system fails or is not available.

summary

[0005]               Embodiments of the invention eliminate a need for a user to manually enter time and/or location information into a non-navigational electronic device (e.g., a sensor, an instrument, a receiver, or the like).  In one embodiment, a device wirelessly receives and stores the time and location information from a LORAN signal.  In addition, the device can supply the time and...