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Use of Anion Exchange Resin Bed Downstream of Mixed Bed to Remove Oxidation Products from Process Stream

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000178225D
Publication Date: 2009-Jan-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Cation exchange resins are useful in a wide range of water treatment applications including water deionization (âcondensate polishingâ) of power plant boilers. Examples of such applications include within the steam or secondary cooling circuit of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR). Unfortunately, cation exchange resins decompose (e.g. oxidize) over time and release organic and inorganic impurities (âleachablesâ) into the process stream. Such decomposition products include various sulfate and sulfonated species (e.g. polystyrene sulfonic acid). While the problems associated with leachables eluting from the cation exchange resin are common to all condensate polishing applications, they can be more of a concern in PWR and BWR applications.

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Use of Anion Exchange Resin Bed Downstream of Mixed Bed

 to Remove Oxidation Products from Process Stream

 

Cation exchange resins are useful in a wide range of water treatment applications including water deionization (“condensate polishing”) of power plant boilers.  Examples of such applications include within the steam or secondary cooling circuit of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR).  Unfortunately, cation exchange resins decompose (e.g. oxidize) over time and release organic and inorganic impurities (“leachables”) into the process stream.  Such decomposition products include various sulfate and sulfonated species (e.g. polystyrene sulfonic acid).  While the problems associated with leachables eluting from the cation exchange resin are common to all condensate polishing applications, they can be more of a concern in PWR and BWR applications.

Various techniques have been used to limit or mitigate the effect of leachables from cation exchange resins, including the use of higher crosslinked cation exchange resin, (see JP 08-224579, JP 09-184899, JP 3687829; and the use of antioxidants (see JP 2517411. Other techniques include positioning a layer of anion exchange resin downstream from the cation exchange resin.  This may be accomplished by including a distinct layer (“under layer”) anion exchange resin within the same bed as the cation exchange resin or mixed bed, e.g....