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Methodology for using test members in automated software application testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000178266D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Jan-21
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Jan-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Software testers often use a directory of "test" members for things like server authentication, application user name's and passwords, mail and address book entries, etc. This methodology help's a tester organize and automate this test process.

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Methodology for using test members in automated software application testing

Methodology for using test members in automated software application testingMethodology for using test members in automated software application testing

Software testers often use a directory of "test" members for things like server authentication, application user name's and passwords, mail and address book entries, etc. Test members are required to test features that require specific user information. A problem occurs when user information can be displayed in the UI in many different ways, For example, if the test member "John Doe" signs into an application and his name is displayed as entered, "John Doe", then test automation can verify this by checking for the display name "John Doe". However, different Operating systems and user directories may display the user information like this "Doe, John". In this case the test will fail because it is looking for "John Doe" not "Doe, John". You could create property files or variables for each test user name variation but it would require constant test maintenance and upkeep depending on the OS and user directory in use.

New Member Usage and Solution to Different OS

New Member Usage and Solution to Different OSNew Member Usage and Solution to Different OS /

///Directory IssueDirectory IssueDirectory Issue

Directory Issue

First, a test user directory, called UserDirectoryUserDirectoryUserDirectory

UserDirectory .

...propertiespropertiesproperties

properties

                                      is created. The UserDirectory.properties file is a properties file in name only. It is really a semicolon, delimited, user data file.

Each line in the UserDirectory.properties file contains information about a specific test member . Each semicolon in the line separates the user properties.

The first line in the above spreadsheet shows the header information: IndexIndexIndex

Index,

,,, UIDUIDUID

UID,

,,, PasswordPasswordPassword

Password ,

,,, ConfirmConfirmConfirm

Confirm

PW

PWPW

PW,,,, First NameFirst NameFirst Name

First Name ,

,,, Last NameLast NameLast Name

Last Name ,

,,, EmailEmailEmail

Email,

,,, LanguageLanguageLanguage

Language,

,,, CNCNCN

CN,,,, DNDNDN

DN,,,, PhonePhonePhone

Phone,

,,, DeptDeptDept

Dept,

,,, Job TitleJob TitleJob Title

Job Title ,

,,, InitialsInitialsInitials

Initials

and DisplayDisplayDisplay

Display

name

namename

name. The following rows contain data about each test member. Each line item corresponds to a specific test member. For example, the User ID or UID for "Susan Adams100" is "susanadams100". The Job Title for "Susan Adams100" is "Test User" (see row 9 in the above spreadsheet image). Row 9, in the spreadsheet above, contains all the user information for "Susan Adams100". There are currently 15 user properties/fields defined in each line item. We can append new fields as necessary. Some fields are filled in and some fields are empty. The empty fields must contain a space. When adding...