Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Installing Software Upgrades with Improved Uninstall Capabilities

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000178304D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Jan-22
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Jan-22
Document File: 4 page(s) / 110K

Publishing Venue

Linux Defenders

Related People

Mr Rich Maggiani: AUTHOR

Abstract

Sometimes upgrades are simply unwanted: because they add unwanted or unneeded “features”; because the upgrade does not run properly on the installed operating system; or because of any number of other reasons. This publication describes a process for backing out of an upgrade and reverting back to the previously installed version.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Page 1 of 4

Linux Invention

Contact Information

Mr Rich Maggiani; rich.maggiani@solari.net

Solari Communication

137 Lost Nation, Suite 14

Essex, Vermont 05452

United States of America

802.879.9330

Title of the Invention

Method for

Installing Software Upgrades with Imp

roved Uninstall Capabilities

Description of the Invention

Sometimes upgrades are simply unwanted: because they add unwanted or unneeded

"features"; because the upgrade does not run properly on the installed operating system;

or because of any number of oth

er reasons. This publication describes a process for

backing out of an upgrade and reverting back to the previously installed version.

Problem or Opportunity

Upgrading the vast majority of

computer software

applications is simple.

In some

examples,

the app

lication

periodically

polls the appropriate web sites searching for an

upgrade to the version currently running on the user computer. When one is found, the

upgrade program notifies the user. In general, the user can then choose to upgrade

immediately or p

ut off the upgrade for a brief period of time (such as a day). Eventually,

the user chooses to install the upgrade.

Sometimes, however, after an upgrade is installed, the user simply does not want it. This

can happen for any number of reasons. The user:

Di

scovers that the upgrade is incompatible with the operating system currently running

on the user computer.

Discovers that the upgrade is incompatible with

another (sometimes more essential)

application

currently running on the user computer.

Realizes that

the upgrade fixes an incompatibility with another application which was

not installed or even owned.

Sees that the upgrade contains unwanted (oftentimes, even annoying) features.

Simply does not want the upgrade.

When this occurs, the user has only one alt

ernative: to reinstall the application from its

initial version and then install whatever upgrades were available to bring the application

Page 2 of 4

back to the version that was running just before the most recent

-

and unwanted

-

upgrade was installed. In other words,

the user must reinstall the application from the

bottom up.

This invention allows the user to uninstall the most recent upgrade, a much quicker and

more reliable process. In other words, arrive at the application's previous version from

the top down.

Page 3 of 4

Detai

led Description of the Invention

Figure 1 shows the flowchart depicting the method for uninstalling an application

upgrade. Following the flowchart is a more detailed explanation of each step.

Start

Decision Step 2:

Want ability to

uninstall this

upgrade?

Step 1: Upgrade available and

accepted.

Yes

Step 3: Create uninstall version of

application to be upgraded.

Step 4: Specify period of time to

keep uninstall ve

rsion.

No

Step 5: Install the upgrade.

No

Decision Step 6:

Uninstall version

created?

Decision Step 7:

After specified

period of time,

uninstall the

upgrade?

Yes

Step 10:...