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Gathering the Most Important User Interface Controls Around the Mouse Cursor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000178852D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Jan-27
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Jan-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The present invention comprises a method whereby the high-value user interface controls (defaulted pushbuttons, first required entry field, etc) positioned on a user interface panel, move to the cursor, rather than the user moving the mouse cursor great distances to acquire the controls.

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Gathering the Most Important User Interface Controls Around the Mouse Cursor

With larger and larger computer displays, the effort to click on a user interface control such as a push button becomes increasingly difficult. When using a mouse or a track ball, the user risks overshooting their target if the control-display ratio is large. On the other hand, the user may incur more effort to move the mouse larger distances if the control-display ration is too fine grained. The present invention comprises a method whereby the high-value user interface controls (defaulted pushbuttons, first required entry field, etc) move to the cursor, rather than the user moving the mouse cursor great distances to acquire the target. In other words, the software moves the targets to the user; the software does the work, so the user does not have to move the mouse cursor larger distances.

In one embodiment:


Step 1 - the mouse cursor moves over the panel that has focus (or clicks on another panel to bring a different panel into focus)

Step 2 - the user makes a unique gesture with the mouse (such as triple clicking, or cording in a unique way)

Step 3 - Then the software controlling the panel with focus presents the defaulted critical user interface (UI) controls clustered around the mouse cursor. These defaulted critical UI controls originally would be set by the creator of the software, but could be modified by the user. (Refer to Figure 1 below)

Step 4 - These UI controls would look as if they have been copied from their original locations and moved to cluster around the mouse cursor. This new technique, the dynamically created area around the mouse cursor, is called the "Gathering Area." Refer to the oval image seen in the upper right hand corner of Figure 1.

Step 5 - The user can then move the mouse cursor a relatively short distance to click on the...