Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Adding an Extra Security Level to Credit Card Data Transmissions to Better Thwart the Data’s Unauthorized Use

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000179063D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Feb-05
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Feb-05
Document File: 5 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

Linux Defenders

Related People

Mr Rich Maggiani: AUTHOR

Abstract

Credit card data transmissions can be intercepted and used to create unauthorized transactions. This invention adds an extra level of security to a credit card transmission, essentially creating a two-step process. This two-step process includes the use of a unique proprietary security key added to the transmission, thus making each transmission unique. Interlopers who intercept this credit card data cannot reuse it since their subsequent transmission will not contain this unique security key.

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Linux Invention

Contact Information

Mr Rich Maggiani; rich.maggiani@solari.net

Solari Communication
137 Lost Nation, Suite 14
Essex, Vermont 05452
United States of America
802.879.9330

Title of the Invention

Method for Adding an Extra Security Level to Credit Card Data Transmissions to Better Thwart the Data’s Unauthorized Use

Description of the Invention

Credit card data transmissions can be intercepted and used to create unauthorized transactions. This invention adds an extra level of security to a credit card transmission, essentially creating a two-step process. This two-step process includes the use of a unique proprietary security key added to the transmission, thus making each transmission unique. Interlopers who intercept this credit card data cannot reuse it since their subsequent transmission will not contain this unique security key.

Problem or Opportunity

For too many, stealing credit card data has become a calling. Credit card information transmitted by a merchant can be been stolen while streaming during a transmission to an online processing service. Thieves then use this credit card information to make unauthorized transactions. Thefts during transmissions can occur regardless of the levels of encryption employed to make transmissions secure. Merchant transmissions that fail to follow the prescribed method for encrypting and securing transmissions are most vulnerable. Human error is frequently the cause of data theft.

Detailed Description of the Invention

This invention adds an extra level of security to a transmission by embedding a security key in with the actual encrypted credit card data.

Linux (running locally on the merchant’s server) sends an encrypted proprietary security key to the (remote) Linux version running on the online processing service’s server. The security key contains a marker that uniquely identifies the encrypted credit card data file.

The remote Linux accepts and validates the security key, then returns a handshake acknowledging that the security key has been successfully received. The remote Linux must return this acknowledgement within a specific (brief) period of time. The local Linux then attaches the security key to the encrypted credit card data and sends this coupled-packet back to the remote Linux.

The acknowledged security key must be imbedded with the encrypted credit card data, otherwise the online processing service does not process the credit card data nor pay the transactions contained in the data. Since the security key changes with each transmission and is included with the actual credit card data, each transmission is unique. If someone steals the credit card data stream and tries to use the credit card data in another transmission, the remote Linux rejects it since this two-step process has not been followed.

The online processing service, thus,...