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System and Method to Automatically Resolve Keystroke Errors When Entering Text Using a Computer Keyboard

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000179568D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Feb-17
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Feb-17
Document File: 4 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This invention describes a system and method to automatically detect and resolve key stroke errors when a computer user is typing data using a keyboard. The invention uses adjacent key mappings and a dictionary to discover potential key stroke errors. The invention presents possible words on the screen as the user is typing.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

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System and Method to Automatically Resolve Keystroke Errors When Entering Text Using a Computer Keyboard

The core idea of this invention surrounds the use of the keyboard and understanding the adjacent keys to a key that was pressed. The idea is that when a user types a character into the computer using the keyboard, the key stroke is logged along with the set of adjacent letters that the user could have meant to have typed. As the user continues to type in the work, the adjacent letters are logged.

As each letter of a word is typed, the computer keeps a list of all words that start with the actual letters types as well as any words that could be made had the user typed an adjacent letter on the keyboard. As the user continues to type, the list of potential words is built up. The invention provides a mechanism to allow the user to see the list of words that the user could be trying to type such that it may be selected prior to typing all of the letters in the word.

The following diagrams show an example:

Assume a standard QWERTY keyboard for this example (although any type of keyboard / language) can be used.

The diagram shows a standard keyboard laid out according to the standard 'QWERTY' layout. The following example shows a user that is typing the work 'SHACK'

1) The user types in the first letter of the word 'S'

Q

W

E

R

T

Y

U

I

A

S

D

F

G

H

J

K

Z

X

C

V

B

N

M

,

1

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Q

W

E

R

T

Y

U

I

A

S

D

F

G

H

J

K

Z

X

C

V

B

N

M

,

2) The letter 'S' appears on the screen. The letters W,E,A,D,Z and X are analyzed in case the user meant to have types one of those letters. At this point, the computer looks to see if any word in its dictionary can start with the letter 'S'. Of course there are many words, so the word is not flagged as having a problem. The computer then looks at each adjacent letter and sees that also, there are words in the dictionary that start with the letters W,E,A,D,Z or X

3) The user types in the next letter of the word - 'H'.

Q

W

E

R

T

Y

U

I

A

S

D

F

G

H

J

K

Z

X

C

V

B

N

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,

4) The letter 'H' appears on the screen. The computer looks to determine whether any word starts with the letters 'SH' - there are , of course, many, so the word is not flagged as an error. The computer then looks to see how many words can start with any of the adjacent letters :

WY WU WG WJ WB WN EY EU EG EJ EB EN AY AU AG AJ

2

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AB


AN
.... etc... etc. through each of the remaining combinations.

5) In this example, only the following combinations are found to be valid :

WU

EU
EG
EJ
EB
EN
AG
AJ
AB
AN
ZU

6) the user types in the next letter 'A"


7) The lette...