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Browse Prior Art Database

Carbon Footprint: Unit based scores at retailers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000180233D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Mar-05
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

People are becoming more and more focussed on the impacts of their buying decisions to the environment. Stores already have information about the weight of an object and where it comes from and by how it arrives. Vendors have information about how an item is shipped, where it is made, and how much electricity it takes to make that item. A system for integrating this information so that customers can make environmentally-informed purchasing decisions in described in this publication.

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Carbon Footprint: Unit based scores at retailers

People are becoming more and more focussed on the impact of their buying decisions on the environment. Stores already have information about the weight of an object, where it comes from, and how it got there. Vendors have information about how an item is shipped, where it is made, and how much electricity it takes to make that item. A system for integrating this information so that customers can make environmentally-informed purchasing decisions is described in this publication.

This publication describes a novel system for calculating a total end-to-end carbon footprint of a single item to help buyers support those who lower their carbon footprint. This system pulls information from multiple sources, specifically the store's own transportation/warehouse system and the vendor's production expense and transportation including their subcontractors, combines that information to calculate a carbon footprint, and displays that carbon footprint to users in the store either on the shelves, on their final receipt, or through product scanners throughout the store.

The total carbon footprint of each item can be calculated and a score can be created on a scale of something like 1 to 100 as to how each of these products affect the environment. The score needs to take into account vendor data, store data (and how they distribute goods through the warehouses) and push those scores to the...