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Method for Associating a Larger Cable Body to a Smaller Connector to Improve Strain Relief, Shielding and Tolerance Management

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000180422D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Mar-09
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This disclosure presents a design concept for high performance copper cables to meet insertion loss requirements by accommodating larger wire diameters when space is constrained.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 74% of the total text.

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Method for Associating a Larger Cable Body to a Smaller Connector to Improve Strain Relief, Shielding and Tolerance Management

     High Performance cable assemblies technologies (e.g. InfiniBand┬«, PCI Express ┬« and similar protocols) requiring copper cable connectivity face insertion loss challenges. Quite often insertion loss requires cables to be manufactured with larger gauge wire to meet loss requirements. The larger gauge wires present assembly and connector 'real estate' issues. Connector backshells are not large enough to accommodate the larger wire diameters. Enlarging the back shell is usually not an option because it will then interfere with adjacent connectors and prevent stacking.

     This invention combines a process and a piece of hardware to solution this issue. The insulation jacket is removed or stripped back. This removes the outer jacket insulation and exposes the wires (and possibly braid and shield). The area exposed that would be placed into the back shell is replaced with a tubular device (either metal or soft plastic) which is then inserted into the back shell. This reduces the OD of the cable making it easily placed into the connector back shell. Strain relief requirements can be met by using shrink tubing or by attaching any braid or shield to the tube with a clamp. This can also improve electrical performance by avoiding clamping directly on wires that may damage the wire causing loss of signal integri...