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Method and System of Designation of Start of Relevant Content in a Digital Asset

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000180569D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Mar-11
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Mar-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a system and method of interlock between two digital assets to be broadcast simultaneously. A specification of a sequence of two digital assets is predetermined. The first digital asset, typically a prerecorded message of known time length, is broadcast, while the system keeps track of how much time is remaining in the first digital asset. The second digital asset consists of a musical selection which contains metadata indicating the point at which "relevant content" (the beginning of the song's vocal content, or a significant instrumental solo) begins.

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Method and System of Designation of Start of Relevant Content in a Digital Asset

Disclosed is a system and method of interlock between two digital assets to be broadcast simultaneously. A specification of a sequence of two digital assets is predetermined. The first digital asset, typically a prerecorded message of known time length, is broadcast, while the system keeps track of how much time is remaining in the first digital asset. The second digital asset consists of a musical selection which contains metadata indicating the point at which "relevant content" (the beginning of the song's vocal content, or a significant instrumental solo) begins.

In radio, television, and web broadcasting, it is often desirable to compress as much content as feasible into each hour of programming. Station and web site advertising revenues are often directly related to how much content can be delivered while also presenting the advertiser's commercial announcements. There are several technical methods unrelated to this invention which have attempted to address this need; for example, digitally compressing song datasets which has the effect of "speeding up" a song almost imperceptibly, while saving several seconds that could be used for commercial messages, weather reports, traffic reports, or public service announcements. One of the most popular methods of compacting content is for a disk

jockey to "talk over" the introduction to the next song to be played. For example, a

classic song consists of a soft guitar and flute introduction lasting 52 seconds before a singer begins to sing. Many disc jockeys will simply talk over the introduction with whatever needs to be communicated, and will stop when the vocals begin. This is entirely not applicable to prerecorded commercial announcements, public service messages, concert announcements, or prerecorded weather forecasts, since there's no method of coordination or interlock between the message to be communicated and the subsequent one to be played. When a prerecorded announcement is played, and it is to be overlaid on the following song to be subsequently played, the entire process must be manually managed by the disc jockey based on his approximations of the message length and his experience knowing when the relevant content begins in the song which immediately follows. This method is not easily led to automation.

As an example of an application of the system and method, the metadata associated with the classic song would be a data value of 52 seconds. The system recognizes the song to be played next, reads the metadata value Z, and automatically begins the next song when Z seconds remain in the prerecorded announcement. The current example might involve a program director specifying a one-minute p...