Browse Prior Art Database

Data Center Optimized Three Power Transformer Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000180927D
Original Publication Date: 2009-Mar-20
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2009-Mar-20
Document File: 5 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

Microsoft

Related People

Scott T. Seaton: INVENTOR [+4]

Abstract

The present solution prevents overloading transformers in a data center. It utilizes N+1 transformers and automatic throw over controls on both the primary and secondary sides of the transformers that seek a source of power when a utility failure occurs. The redundancy provided by utilizing N+1 transformers allows for routine maintenance and component failures without an extended shutdown of the entire data center. Added ties are installed on the primary side of the transformers to allow for complete isolation of any component without need to power down more than one transformer at a time. This downstream secondary distribution design also allows the transformers to operate normally at air-cooled rating (N+1 transformers online), but the design has capacity to run the entire site with just N transformers in their full fan-cooled rating. This provides a cost efficient design that is optimized for energy efficiency and redundancy.

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Data Center Optimized Three Power Transformer Design

            A data center is a facility housing computer systems and associated components, which includes a power system designed to provide continuous service.  The power system typically utilizes a utility power source and N-transformers that support the electric load provided by the data center’s computer systems and associated components.  A backup power supply, such as a generator, supports the load from a transformer that has failed or is offline for maintenance.  In some instances where no backup power supply is used, N-1 transformers will support their load and the load from the failed transformer.

            An example of a prior system includes N 138 KV transformers that feed a 120 MVA data center.  This data center may not utilize backup generators but still requires the ability to be fault tolerant and to be concurrently maintainable.  In these prior systems, when a transformer goes offline, N-1 transformers become overloaded because they support the loads of all N transformers.  The present solution prevents overloading transformers in an N-transformer data center.  The present solution utilizes N+1 transformers and automatic throw over controls on both the primary and secondary sides of the transformers that seek a source of power when a single utility, transformer, or distribution component failure occurs.

            The redundancy provided by utilizing N+1 transformers to power a data center allows for routine maintenance and component failures without an extended shutdown of the entire data center.  Figure 1 below shows a three transformers design of the present N+1 transformer solution.  In Figure 1, a concurrently maintainable and fault-tolerant system is achieved by utilizing a three-transformer design with two utility sources.  The primary sides of the transformers are set up with automatic and manual controls to allow them to switch to either source or any combination of two transformers.  Added ties are installed on the primary side of the transformers to allow for complete isolation of any component without need to power down more than one transformer at a time.  This downstream secondary distribution design also allows the transformers to operate normally at air-cooled rating (three transformers online), but the design has capacity to run the entire site with just two transformers in their full fan-cooled rating.  This provides a cost efficient design that is optimized for energy efficiency and redundancy.

Figure 1

            As previously mentioned, utility class transformers have air-cooled and fan-cooled ratings.  In Figure 1, each transformer has an air-cooled rating of 40 MVA, a semi fan-cooled rating of 53 MVA, and a full fan-cooled rating of 66 MVA.  In the pres...